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"March is a month of considerable frustration - it is so near spring and yet across a great deal of the country the weather is still so violent and changeable that outdoor activity seems light years away."
Thalassa Cruso
Learn English in March

Superstition

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Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    @Elle: 'Thank you for your research and the article. It represents me a lot. It means a lot to me.'
  • ElleElle Posts: 508 Inactive
    @mheredge thank you for you correction. It means a lot to me like you corrected, but what I wanted to say was not quite the meaning..
    I meant that the article says what I want to say like a spokesperson. That's why I used 'represent'. :) If the sentence is still wrong with the meaning, you are welcome to correct it.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    I get you. So what you mean is that the article represents what you think @Elle.

    I tend to use ceiling fans a bit when I'm in a very hot country @Elle, but avoid air conditioning wherever possible. I did appreciate it when I was in Ho Chi Minh City in December though. Even though this is the coolest time of year there, it would have been too hot for me without using it.
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    We used to believe in this superstition in college but with skylarks. :)


  • astralia123astralia123 Posts: 37 ✭✭
    edited March 2016
    Hmmm...I just think of one. If you watch a lot of Japanese anime or things like that, you might know a thing called "death flag", which is a certain type of lines that indicates the character's death. This specific concept has been quite extended among people who know its origin, and now it can refer to anything one could say that may indicate failure.
    It is kind of hard to explain here, but in general, a "death flag line" is something of no strangeness if one speaks of it under normal circumstances, while it can be seen as an omen of death or failure under another circumstance - like before the battle or before an important examination.

    For anime fans, it is usually just a material of joking around, and almost everyone knows it is just a joke when you speak in that manner. However, aside from joking, people can be observed avoiding such death-flag-lines themselves.
    For example, provoking the opponent by boasting yourself before a competition is a common type of death-flag-line, as in sport comics it is almost a certain sign that the speaker will be defeated later. You will not see someone knowingly commit that; one will not even make joke of such a certain death-flag-line. It is hard to say, as people certainly know that "death flag lines" have no supernatural power that can cause you to fail, yet they will avoid doing some certain things in the reference to its logic.


    Hmm...well, anyway, it is hard to say.
    But if this can be seen as a sort of superstition (which is how I view it), then I guess superstition really needs no real tradition or anything. Just like dice superstitions (people who play TRPG might know it), it just generates from what you cannot control - luck, randomness, or whatever you call it.
  • ElleElle Posts: 508 Inactive
    @mheredge thank you for your correction. Yes! That was what I wanted to say, "The article represents what I think." ;)

    I've been to Bangkok once, and it was almost 40~42°C with high humidity..
    The tour guide said it has still four seasons which are hot, hotter, very hot, and extremely hot.. LOL
  • ElleElle Posts: 508 Inactive
    @astralia123 are you from Japan? ;) I'm just guessing..
    I think between Korea and Japan have so many similar superstitions since we are located so closed... what do you think? ;)
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    I spent a couple of months in Cambodia a year or so back where I just melted @Elle. It was exhausting just to move! Even sitting a few inches away from a fan wasn't enough to cool down.
  • ElleElle Posts: 508 Inactive
    @mheredge wow.. that sounds are already melting me.. ;) I just realized that you travel a lot which is good! :)
  • astralia123astralia123 Posts: 37 ✭✭
    @Elle No, I'm Chinese. But I guess I could say I do know a few things about Japan, at least through anime, comics and so on. So as you are Korean, you must have a picture how influential Japanese pop culture has become these years.
    I have been thinking, that most traditional forms of Chinese superstitions have died out or are just about to die out these years, so I do not know much better about them - I know them from books and Internet sources, not from direct experience
    .
    And Korean superstition...well I know much less about that. Would you introduce some?
  • ElleElle Posts: 508 Inactive
    @astralia123 I don't know much about Japanese animation..
    I know that China is one of countries that has so many superstitions.. but you said they are gone these days. It's interesting for me..

    Well.. Korean superstitions.. there are so many things and hard to pick up one to introduce.
    Korean love number 3, like Chinese loves number 8, so we give it a try three times almost always in any situation. :)
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    I guess maybe in the countryside @astralia123, people are still hanging on to their superstitions a bit aren't they? Or have they really been completed lost?
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    @srinij Do people practice this one in India?
    Lemon and green chillies tied on the doorways of shops, business establishments and Hindu homes is a common sight in India.

  • astralia123astralia123 Posts: 37 ✭✭
    @mheredge
    @Elle
    Well, I know there are some superstitions related to health, but I have not encountered those related to luck and supernatural beings for a very long time. There are still a few of them, I'm afraid.

    Those related to health...You may have heard people have been fearing that electromagnetic radiation could damage their health in China. It is reported in some places people force telecoms operators to pull down communication base stations that are too near to residence blocks. (I kind of suspect this has happened not too far away, as there is no mobile signal near a certain bus stop, which is quite unusual in town.)

    There are also tons of pseudo-science products claiming they could ease such damage, including “radiation proof eyegoggles" or films over the display devices. People have been suggested to turn off cellphones before sleep, or put small green plants near the computers, and so on.
    It has been better these years, but still some of my workmates would suggest me close the lid of a laser scanner and step away from it while it was working, "Watch out for the radiation!"

    Similar fears sometimes plague petrochemical plants. Okay maybe I continue writing after work.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm not so sure that fearing electromagnetic radiation is superstitious @astralia123 but maybe has some sense. I'm not all that sure the scientists really understand the side-effects and I have even heard doctors say that some people can be susceptible to feeling unwell due to things like this.
  • astralia123astralia123 Posts: 37 ✭✭
    @mheredge Well, there is no evidence that electromagnetic radiation has any effect on human health, but this is a form of modern superstition not just because they are wrong (which might possibly be revealed to be the case, though unlikely), but because they reached this conclusion in a very superstitious way.

    I was about mentioning the similar problem that troubles petrochemical industry. Just about a year ago or so, the public had been in panic about paraxylene, as they think this material very toxic. In fact it only has minor toxicity, and the final petrochemical products that involve this material are usually not toxic at all.
    Yet this still has its political influence, and several petrochemical projects have been cancelled or halted because local residence require these plants "locate at least 100 km away from resident blocks".
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm not sure whether electromagnetic fields affect everyone in the same way @astralia123. I think some people are sensitive to them and others not.

    I think there's a difference between superstition and misunderstanding however @astralia123. Superstition is usually a belief based on some old tradition. I don't think that awareness about the side-effects of electro-magnetic radiation has been around long enough for it to have built up any superstitious beliefs about it. I think this is more like a misunderstanding or misconception.
  • LaszloMarkLaszloMark Posts: 89 Inactive
    @Bubbly Wow, i don't know, that this is superstition:
    "One for sorrow, two for joy, three for a girl, four for a boy..."
    But i know this phrase from a lyrics. The artist is "Counting Crows", which explains a lot now that i know that.(but i read now, that these are magpies not crows) And the track is "Murder Of One". Very interesting.
    Anyway it's an interesting superstition. I think it similar like when you counting the flower leafs. You know: "She loves me - tear one leaf - she doesn't love me - and tear another one..." And the last one show you if he/she love you too.
  • KhaliedKhalied EgyptPosts: 2,228 ✭✭✭✭✭
    My mother said to me bough dirty water in your in front of your flat to protect you against magic but I don't like to do that that's superstition
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    I'd be afraid having dirty water around the house would just encourage flies or mosquitoes @gomaa. I wonder where the idea of it helping to ward off magic comes from.
  • KhaliedKhalied EgyptPosts: 2,228 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge thought the dirty water destroy any magic but I don't believe that . Did you know my friend I meet someone make magic told me the magic create by dirty things and sometimes you need to do dirty things to avoid magic but I don't believe that's words just listening finally this person make magic will life in dark all life because the magic create by dark. If you want to protect yourself against any magic just take leaves palm trees. Finally I want to say I don't believe that because Allah control everything in our life and I can protect myself by read Quran every day and say some words before to enter bathroom and some words when you left
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    I think you are right not to take these superstitions seriously @gomaa.
  • KhaliedKhalied EgyptPosts: 2,228 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge if Allah doesn't do any harm to you no one can hurt you. I believe that
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    @LaszloMark It is more like a rhyme but I was used to believe in counting skylarks when I was in college. :)
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,438 ✭✭✭✭
    Three magpies are supposed to be bad luck. I don't know why, unless it's to do with 'two's company, three's a crowd.'
  • srinijsrinij Posts: 213 ✭✭✭
    @bubbly, since one month I'm not active in the forum due to personal work. As you ask about lemons and chillies majority of Hindu family follow this. Here people believe if you tied on the door or any vehicle bad things don't happen in a family or person.
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2016
    @srinij really interesting! But, they will have to replace it again and again as lemons and chilli are perishable food items.
    Post edited by Bubbly on
  • srinijsrinij Posts: 213 ✭✭✭
    edited March 2016
    @Bubbly all such things do because of fear if we say it won't work they do not trust us But they believe babas or persists..They are cheating people for their personal benefit
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2016
    Who wants to try it? ;)

    Stay forever young by carrying an acorn
    Forget anti-ageing creams - in Ancient Britain, women carried acorns in their pockets to stay looking young. According to Richard Webster in The Encyclopedia of Superstitions the oak tree was believed to provide longevity and to ward off illness due to its long life.

  • torelliptorellip Posts: 797 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't believe to superstitions, but old traditions/superstitions are really interesting. In some way, they teach us how people try to overcome their most deep fears and we can better understand the human mind.
    When I was a child my grandmother was used to prepar a necklace with chestnuts at the beninig of winter time for each one of the family. She was convinced that the necklace was able to keep us free form cold and flu.
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