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Whose bonnets touch the firmament --
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Meek at whose everlasting feet
A myriad daisy play --
Which, Sir, are you and which am I
Upon an August day?

Emily Dickinson
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Superstition

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Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    In the villages in the countryside in Nepal, there are still shamans and people still believe in witches @torellip. Poor people generally go to the shaman first if they are sick, rather than seek medical attention. It can be a big problem. Often they only come to a doctor when it is too late.
  • torelliptorellip Posts: 797 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge I agree with you. Superstitions and irrational belief have not to take place of scientific knowledge. But in some context supersition is not dangerous and it can be reassuring. Most people living in Naple, in Souther Italy, take a horn-shaped amulet in the pocket to protect themselves against the Evil Eye. I don't believe neither in the Evil Eye nor in the power of the "little horn", but I don't think that this habit can affect their life negatively.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    As long as they don't really think it will save them @torellip!
  • LaszloMarkLaszloMark Posts: 89 Inactive
    @torellip I think some superstition are expensive. Lot of fortune-teller and seer only do this for money, and they are liars. Some times ago in my country, 2 fortune-teller squeeze out more than 35000$ from an old couple, because they are believe in them. The 2 fortune-teller tell the old couple, they have garbling, and they can take off them for money. The more money, the more it works! And they sell them amulets, necklaces, magical stones and many other things. Nearly dispossessed the old couple. It's a sad story.
    I think most people believe in these superstitions because they want to believe in something. They are just want hold on to something, and they are afraid of the future. And it's easier to believe in a piece of stone than themselves. They cant believe that they can control their own life.
    And i agree with mheredge. As long as nobody hurts, it 's not a problem.
  • [Ex Member][Ex Member] Posts: 0 ✭✭
    I'm not superstitious. I don't know people who is really superstitious. Only thing what I avoid do is passes by tree through different sides (while walking side by side with friend), because it will cause argument (or so people say :)) And my friends also don't do that. I hope you understood what I wrote, because I'm only learning english now.
    And Friday 13th I don't belive. We'll have last bell (in Latvia it is the last day when we need to learn all lessons, after last bell starts learning only for exam) on 13th Friday. :smiley:
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    @LaszloMark it is always very sad when fraudsters play on people's ignorance and fears.

    Why do you pass trees on different sides when you are with a friend @Laurucis? I've never heard of this superstition before.
  • [Ex Member][Ex Member] Posts: 0 ✭✭
    we don't pass trees on different sides because it would cause dispute. I don't know if it's true, but it's only superstitions which I believe. :)
  • susheelasusheela Posts: 56 ✭✭
    @navidafrasiabian ,sorry to respond lately, No, not at all I doesnot believe in superstitions . I only believe the things which is proved scientificaly
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    Me neither @susheela. I don't walk under ladders, not for any superstitious reason but just out of common sense.
  • kindgnicekindgnice LEO Motivator!!! Posts: 7,958 mod
    I remember the Monkey's Paw story from Bubbly's session. :) The talisman... :)
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    Christians often wear St Christopher medallions which is supposed to help protect travellers. So many of these superstitions date back to paganism. I can't quite understand how a pendant with a picture of a man crossing a river can really prevent an accident while you're out travelling somewhere.
  • KhaliedKhalied EgyptPosts: 2,228 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Don't look at eyes cat maybe will fall in magic
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    I have rings with different gemstones but not Opal. But, I will buy it just to check this superstition. ;)




    If your absolute favourite stone is the Opal, you’re out of luck…literally since this stone is said to bring bad luck to whoever wears it. This superstition stemmed from the best selling novel ‘Anne of Geierstein’ by Sir Walter Scott in 1829 where Lady Hermione was falsely accused of being a demon as she dies shortly after a drop of holy water accidentally falls on her opal jewellery and changes its colour. This book had such an effect on the image of the Opal that shortly after its publication, the Opal market crashed and Opal prices dropped by 50%.
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,882 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2016
    The worst superstition ever...Much to my dismay, I learned about the persecution of albino recently.
    People many in east Africa believe that albino is a punishment from god or bad luck and crazily consider
    that their body part will bring a good fortune to the user (owner) by the rich. Even after they died,
    their graves are dug up and desecrated. Things like that should be blamed, punished and expelled!! :(
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge yesterday, a black cat crossed me whilst I was going to office. It brought a good luck for me. Should I keep on thinking about it as a good luck sign for me? ;)
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,882 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Bubbly
    It(black cat) is a good company, good luck and potential ability of the girl in 'Kiki's Delivery Service':)
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    @Shiny03 but I don't believe in these superstitions.
  • kindgnicekindgnice LEO Motivator!!! Posts: 7,958 mod
    @Shiny03 said:

    @Bubbly

    It(black cat) is a good company, good luck and potential ability of the girl in 'Kiki's Delivery Service':)

    Yes my friend, honestly, my Japanese-Filipino cousin has her own kitten like this:

    :)
  • kindgnicekindgnice LEO Motivator!!! Posts: 7,958 mod


    According to Japanese culture, it is said that:

    The maneki-neko (Japanese: 招き猫?, literally "beckoning cat") is a common Japanese figurine (lucky charm, talisman) which is often believed to bring good luck to the owner. In modern times, they are usually made of ceramic or plastic. The figurine depicts a cat (traditionally a calico Japanese Bobtail) beckoning with an upright paw, and is usually displayed in—often at the entrance of—shops, restaurants, pachinko parlors, and other businesses. Some of the sculptures are electric or battery-powered and have a slow-moving paw beckoning. The maneki-neko is sometimes also called the welcoming cat, lucky cat, money cat, happy cat, beckoning cat, or fortune cat in English.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maneki-neko

    @Shiny03
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    I think black cats are lucky @Bubbly. They are very beautiful too.
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,882 ✭✭✭✭✭
    > @Bubbly said:
    > @Shiny03 but I don't believe in these superstitions.

    I see your point, but it's a good novel, I just want you to be interested in it without any inherent thought :)
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,882 ✭✭✭✭✭
    > @kindgnice said:
    > Yes my friend, honestly, my Japanese-Filipino cousin has her own kitten like this:

    You mean you have relatives in Japan. Wow, have you ever been in Japan?
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge not in all countries, I think. :)
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    @Shiny03 I got your point. But, I enjoyed it when people talk about the good and the bad effects of these superstitions.
  • kindgnicekindgnice LEO Motivator!!! Posts: 7,958 mod
    @Shiny03 said:

    > @kindgnice said:

    > Yes my friend, honestly, my Japanese-Filipino cousin has her own kitten like this:



    You mean you have relatives in Japan. Wow, have you ever been in Japan?

    Yes my friend. I really love the clean environment and the peaceful culture. :) Perhaps we can start a topic about Japan? ;)
  • kindgnicekindgnice LEO Motivator!!! Posts: 7,958 mod
    @mheredge said:

    I think black cats are lucky @Bubbly. They are very beautiful too.

    My cousin from Japan has black cat too. :)
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,890 ✭✭✭✭
    That was the worst superstition I have ever heard. :)
    kindgnice said:

    I remember the Monkey's Paw story from Bubbly's session. :) The talisman... :)

  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,882 ✭✭✭✭✭
    > @kindgnice said:
    > Yes my friend. I really love the clean environment and the peaceful culture. :) Perhaps we can start a topic about Japan? ;)

    Where have you visited in Japan?
  • kindgnicekindgnice LEO Motivator!!! Posts: 7,958 mod
    I visited Nagoya (My aunt's hometown), Tokyo (My company's branch/counterpart), Kyoto (Shrines, Golden Pavilion), and Osaka (Universal Studios) :)

    I really enjoyed the Golden Pavilion in Kinkaku-ji. :) @Shiny03



    According to Japanese culture, it is mentioned that:

    On July 2, 1950, at 2:30 am, the pavilion was burned down by a 22-year-old novice monk, Hayashi Yoken, who then attempted suicide on the Daimon-ji hill behind the building. He survived, and was subsequently taken into custody. The monk was sentenced to seven years in prison, but was released because of mental illnesses (persecution complex and schizophrenia) on September 29, 1955; he died of tuberculosis [7] During the fire, the original statue of Ashikaga Yoshimitsu was lost to the flames (now restored). A fictionalized version of these events is at the center of Yukio Mishima's 1956 book The Temple of the Golden Pavilion.[2]
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,882 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @kindgnice Great! because I live in Osaka:)
    Did you read the novel?
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