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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February

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@yevhen's texts

aprilapril ModeratorPosts: 10,549 mod
@Yevhen ,

You can write your texts here.
Have fun! :)
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Comments

  • YevhenYevhen Posts: 77 ✭✭
    Thank you @april for your time and help. I do appreciate this :)

    One friend of mine works in an it-company that requires English and hires English teachers to help their employees to improve it. He passed a test some time ago. Of course detailed results were reported to chiefs and those who are interested in that. But my friend is a curious one and asked about them. Here is a short answer he was given:

    "Hello - some aspects of English changed for better (according to the test) but some didn’t :(
    Generally - slight upgrade took place."

    I don't want to judge anyone especially English teachers in informal messages but as far as I know there are some mistakes. Here my concerns:
    1. "change for the better" is an idiom so the definite article "the" is missed.
    2. "a slight upgrade". I searched a word "upgrade" and found out that it is countable and has both singular and plural forms. It seems the indefinite article "a" must have been used.
    3*. Using dashes. I am not familiar with this topic yet but my gut tells me that a dash is used in situations where it is not needed or at least can be omitted.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    @GemmaRowlands?
    What do you think of @Yevhen writing and questions? :)
    , @GemmaRowlands .
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    @Yevhen , I"ve posted your text in the category A Question of English.
    Maybe that's the better place for your questions. :)
  • YevhenYevhen Posts: 77 ✭✭
    Thank you @april , you're very generous ;)
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    You still could write another story here and get it corrected, @Yevhen . :)
  • YevhenYevhen Posts: 77 ✭✭
    edited November 2016
    Hi @april . Finally I've got something to be put down here. I tried my best and the writing took two hours and a half. I am still slow :)

    ***
    A friend of mine I’ll call VGrey works in a company that is looking for new employees now told me he was asked by our mutual group mate I’ll call HmAssemble to introduce him as a potential candidate. Of course he gladly agreed to help.

    At present HmAssemble successfully passed 2 of 3 stages of interviewing. The last one is about English. Who would doubt that nowadays?

    I’ve got a message from VGrey today in which he informed me that HmAssemble called him and took an interest in possible questions he may be asked during the test of spoken English. To tell the truth this made me smile.

    I can still remember the time when I had my first English interview. At that moment all my language skills including knowledge of grammar were weak. In order to prepare for the test I questioned myself trying to assume possible ways a conversation with an English teacher could take place. Almost the same happened when we were students and had exams. Inquiring of mates who have already passed an exam about asked questions was a usual student habit that was often caused by ignorance or poor understanding of theme.

    Returning to the thing which amused me I must admit it also got me thinking of being a probable and having a similar situation. Would I ask such questions hoping to cheat an interviewer?

    Speaking for myself I would not. I would not think in terms of questions or possible topics. Since I had my first interview I have improved my English. My speaking and a lot of other aspects are still desired to be better but being even on the current level allows me not to think about such cheats. In any case an interviewer will dig deeper and deeper by changing topics as often as it is needed to reach your real proficiency.

    What about you guys? Most of you are English learners. I guess at least some of you were in such situations. Were your thoughts changed as your English got better? What do you think?

    -----------------

    A friend of mine, I’ll call him VGrey, works in a company that is looking for new employees. He told me he was asked by a mutual friend, I’ll call HmAssemble, to introduce him as a potential candidate. Of course he gladly agreed to help.

    At present HmAssemble has successfully passed 2 out of 3 stages of interviews. The last one is about English. Who would doubt that nowadays?

    I got a message from VGrey today in which he informed me that HmAssemble had called him and expressed an interest in the questions he may be asked during the spoken English test. To tell the truth this made me smile.

    I can still remember the time when I had my first English interview. At that moment all my language skills, including my knowledge of grammar, were weak. In order to prepare for the test I questioned myself, trying to imagine all the possible ways a conversation with an English teacher could go. Almost the same thing happened when we were students and had exams. Inquiring of mates who had already passed an exam about the questions was a common student habit, often caused by ignorance or poor understanding of the theme.

    Returning to the thing which amused me; I must admit it also got me thinking about being in a similar situation. Would I ask such questions hoping to cheat an interview?

    Speaking for myself I would not. I do not think in terms of questions or possible topics. Since I had my first interview I have improved my English. My speaking and a lot of other aspects could be better, but being at my current level allows me to not think about such cheats. In any case an interviewer will dig deeper and deeper by changing topics as often as needed to reach your real proficiency.

    What about you guys? Most of you are English learners. I guess at least some of you have been in such situations. Did your thoughts change as your English got better?

    What do you think?
    Post edited by Teach on
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    Great, @Yevhen .
    Hopefully @GemmaRowlands will have time to read your text soon. :)
  • DeucalionDeucalion Posts: 1,079 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2017
    @April, it looks like Gemma Rowlands doesn't descend to comment on whatever we ask.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    @Deucalion , maybe I didn't ask her nicely enough? :D
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,127 mod
    Reading anything that you find interesting helps improve your skills @Yevhen. The key is that it should interest you, as like you say, it requires a lot of time. Reading should be fun, not an ordeal!
  • DeucalionDeucalion Posts: 1,079 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2017
    A-a-h-a-a... I gotcha, @april! You are from that category of people who use to start examining their own possible mistakes first. :blush:
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    Yes, @Deucalion I always blame myself. :D
  • DeucalionDeucalion Posts: 1,079 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2017
    In regard to such kind person as you are, @April, it is too unfair. :(
  • YevhenYevhen Posts: 77 ✭✭
    Hello! Tried to connect some new words in a story.

    There once was a guy named William. He was very patriotic. He installed a flagpole in front of his house and hung his national flag on it. Every time when he came back home and saw the flag swinging high in the sky, he felt proud of his country. It toughened William up every time he had a hard time obeying unjust laws. He was wide awake to the danger of losing the retention of his flag. Therefore, trying to find an outlet for these anxious feelings, William always reassured himself before going to bed. It helped him take it down early.
  • YevhenYevhen Posts: 77 ✭✭
    Sometimes I practise with TV-series by retelling dialogues as if certain events happened with me in the past.

    One of the biggest challenges that I face doing it is deciding whether to use direct/indirect reported speech. I used to backshift tense verbs and use what they call 'an attracted sequence of tenses'. Imho, it is harder to do when speaking and most English learners just ignore indirect reported speech saying that it doesn't sound natural or there is no need in it in informal speaking.

    It still seems fuzzy... I've been strugling with this for a long time and clearly see how negatively it affects my speaking. Insted of using simple tenses and increasing my vocabulary I do some mental acrobatic in my head considering whether to backshift tense verbs and feel guilty if I decide not to. Just happened to be taught these indirect reported speech rules...

    I came up with the idea to combine indirect reported speech with some rephrasing, simplifying etc., but can't shake off questions on how natural or correct it would sound.

    Here is an excert from "Modern Family" and my attemtp to retell it.


    SCRIPT

    Phil, "It's gonna be worth it".
    Haley, " No, it's not."
    Phil, "Don't listen to her."
    Phil, "Sorry. Don't struggle. Stop struggling".
    Claire, "Great. It's our car."
    Phil, "Not a car. Kids?"

    Phil, "Tonight, Claire dunphy, we are turning back the clock. To a simpler time, when families piled into their station wagons, picked up some burgers, and went on a picnic up to Granger point.
    Craire, "Honey, we don't have to do this."
    Luke, "Listen to her."

    Phil, "No, it's gonna be great. I talked to Nick, and he's not picking up the car till tomorrow. We have one more night of family fun!"

    Luke, "What's gonna be fun about it?"
    Claire, "Yourather is trying to do something nice, So I would appreciate it if you would stop your whining and just get in the car."


    HOW I WOULD TRY TO SAY WHEN SPEAKING

    Phil told her wife it was gonna be worth it, though his daugter, Hailey, doubted.

    Looking how his wife was strugling taking off the bandage, Phil asked her not to stuggle and helped her out.
    Claire got dissapointed having seen their car and kids standing before it. Phil said it was not just a car and asked kids to move away to show Claire the banner he had made earlier with words "Time Machine" on it.

    He explained that that night they were turning back the clock to a simpler time, when families (past simple or past perfect?) had piled into their station wagons, (ps or pp?) picked up some burgers and (ps or pf?) went on a picnic up to Granger point.

    Clair said they didn't have to do that and Luke backed his mom up advising his dad to listen to her. Phil went on persuading how great it was going to be. He had talked to Nick and agreed on that he would pick up the car the following day, so they had one more night of family fun.

    When Luke asked his dad what was going to be fun about it, Claire answered insted of him pointing out that his father was trying to do something nice. She told the kids that she'd appreciate it if they stop their whining and just get in the car.
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 2,904 mod
    @Yevhen - Hi. I am not a grammar expert so hope I don't tell you the wrong thing!

    Phil told HIS wife it was gonna be worth it, though his daugHter, Hailey, doubted IT.

    Looking AT how his wife was struGgling TO takE off the bandage, Phil TOLD her not to stRuggle and helped her out.

    Claire BECAME dissapPointed having seen their car and kids. Phil said it was not just a car and asked THE kids to move away to show Claire the banner he had made earlier with words "Time Machine" on it.

    He explained HOW that night they were turning back the clock to a simpler time, when families (past simple or past perfect?) piled into their station wagons, (ps or pp?) picked up some burgers and (ps or pf?) went on a picnic up to Granger point.

    ClairE said they didn't have to do that and Luke backed his mom up advising his dad to listen to her. Phil CARRIED on TRYING TO persuadE THEM how great it was going to be. He had talked to Nick and agreed that he would pick up the car the following day, so they had one more night of family fun.

    When Luke asked his dad what was going to be fun about it, Claire answered insteAd of him pointing out that his father was trying to do something nice. She told the kids that she'd appreciate it if they WOULD stop their whining and just get in the car.
  • YevhenYevhen Posts: 77 ✭✭
    @amatsuscribbler , thank you very much. That is exactly what I wanted - a feedback to get a better idea whether that way of describing events was more or less OK.
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 2,904 mod
    Well, as I say I am not an expert. But you are very welcome.
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