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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February

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Monday Night Owls - 21 November 2016 - 10 Common Sayings With Historical Origins

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 965 Teacher
We read the stories behind 10 common sayings in English:

http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/10-common-sayings-with-historical-origins

Vocabulary Top 11:

pit - to cause someone or something to fight or compete against another person or thing

pachyderm - a type of animal that has hooves and thick skin (like elephant, rhinocerous, hippopotamus, etc)

wield - to have and use power, influence, etc; to hold (something, such as a tool or weapon) in your hands so that you are ready to use it

ostensibly - seeming or said to be true or real but very possibly not true or real

triumph - a great success or achievement; a great or important victory

basking - to enjoy the attention and good feelings expressed by others; to lie or relax happily in a bright and warm place

escapade - an exciting, foolish, or dangerous experience or adventure

shorthand - a short or quick way of showing or saying something; a method of writing quickly by using symbols or abbreviations for sounds, words, or phrases

spree - a short period of time when you do a lot of something

penchant - a strong liking for something or a strong tendency to behave in a certain way

impede - to slow the movement, progress, or action of someone or something


Do you know the story behind any other common sayings or idioms?

Try using some of the sayings from the article in a sentence!

Comments

  • RemaRema Posts: 1,149 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2016
    The robbers was running amok a jewelry shop, stealing and breaking everything on their way.
    A salesgirl didn't like the owner of the shop because of non-regular wages but had to cry to avoid torment so she shed crocodile tears.
    The shop was devastated few times before and it was the owner's white elephant.
    His father had been a olympic-boxing golden-medal winner, but after it he just rested on laurels.
    Passers turned blind eye during passing by the shop, but one of them noticed familar face amongst the robbers- ' Oh this is Rob, one of my son's friends. My son has to rub shoulders with a better company. I'll read him the riot act.'
    Rob dressed in black, from top to toe, because he was a diehard gothic music fan.
    With a very expansive necklace in his hand Rob shouted - ' We are going to paint the town red tonight.'
    Marko
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 965 Teacher
    awesome story @Rema ! I loved it, great use of all these phrases! Are you going to write a second part of the story with the last two phrases? ;)

    Some corrections:
    Rema said:

    The robbers were running amok in a jewelry shop, stealing and breaking everything on their way.
    A salesgirl didn't like the owner of the shop because of non-regular wages but she had to cry to avoid torment so she shed crocodile tears.
    The shop was had been devastated a few times before and it was the owner's white elephant.
    His father had been an olympic-boxing golden-medal winner, but after it he just rested on his laurels.
    Passers by turned a blind eye when they passed by the shop, but one of them noticed a familar face amongst the robbers- ' Oh this is Rob, one of my son's friends. My son has to rub shoulders with a better company. I'll read him the riot act.'
    Rob dressed in black, from top to toe, because he was a diehard gothic music fan.
    With a very expensive necklace in his hand Rob shouted - ' We are going to paint the town red tonight.'

  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 965 Teacher
    Here is another article that tells the stories behind some other idioms: https://owlcation.com/humanities/Common-Idioms-and-Phrases-Meanings-and-Origins
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,861 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2016
    It’s not raining cats and dogs anymore. It can also rain buckets in Spanish, old hags in Dutch, dog poop in Cantonese, old ladies and sticks/knives and forks in Welsh, ears and eyes shut in Tai, rods/ ladles in Swedish, frogs in Polish, fire and brimstone in Icelandic, chair legs in Greek, ropes/halberds/nails in French, earth and sand in Japanese, female trolls in Norwegian and even raining husbands in Colombian Spanish. :D

    It's raining men.


    It's raining hamburgers.


    Last, have a lunch? :smiley:

    Post edited by Shiny03 on
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