Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

"March is a month of considerable frustration - it is so near spring and yet across a great deal of the country the weather is still so violent and changeable that outdoor activity seems light years away."
Thalassa Cruso
Learn English in March

Un unforgetable story

PaulettePaulette Posts: 25,820 mod
edited February 2017 in People and Society
Have you ever had a special experience? Could you tell us a personal story that you will never forget and that makes you smile?

Tell us about:
  • A hilarious moment
  • A stressed moment...
  • A comic moment...
  • A strange moment etc....
One day a long time ago when I was much younger, my lady friend and I visited a colleague in the maternity clinic (she had got a cute daughter named Cathy). Whilst we visited her we drank a glass of champagne together ( I think it was only one!). In Belgium it is a custom to recieve a little present with candy in it from the baby. Cathy's father had made little sailing boats with candy in it. Cathy's name was printed on the sail.

When we left the maternity unit, we received such a boat. After that we walked to my car on the parking, I took my car key (it was a normal key, not with a remote control you often see nowadays) and I opened the door. We placed the boat with the sweets in it on the dasboard and I tried to start my car.

Nothing happened. I tried it again and again, but still nothing happened. Then my friend looked in the back of the car and she said: "This isn't your car! Look at all these documents!" And indeed it wasn't my car. It was what you could call a look-alike. We left the car very quickly and I looked around. Then we saw my car parked just a little bit further... I wondered if it had been because of t the champagne???? I don't know. But what I know now is that Cathy's sailing boat was still in the other car. What the driver must have thought !!!!
Post edited by Frank on
«1

Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    That sounds like an interesting experience!

    For me, my best experience was standing at the top of the Empire State Building in New York and it start thundering&lightening. It was beautiful to watch - but probably a little dangerous, really! I know that I will never forget the feeling of standing there and watching it.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,966 Inactive
    @GemmaRowlands
    Just imagine what would it be like to have your office in one of those skyscrapers. You'll be walking in and working in there every day, and sometimes you'll probably have a windy day or a stormy day! Or, maybe you might even have to work overtime with no one around with you!
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 25,820 mod
    @takafromtokyo @mheredge @prateek @mohit_singh @jackelliot @Michouxe

    This is my story about a Peanut Allergy

    This is personal to me, because I have already a peanut allergy for over 60 years. My allergy was discovered when I was four or five year old by eating a small sandwich with peanut butter.
    At age 4 or 5, I experienced a reaction called anaphylaxis, which is severe and can be life-threatening. I was at a party with my aunt, and there I eaten a cookie with peanut butter (rather thick smeared),than I did an allergic reaction and I was rushed to the hospital because I could not breathe.
    I knew about that allergy because my parents told me.

    And now the story: for my first oral exam I was quite nervous and while I get repeated some material, a classmate offered me a calming nibble. I was not thinking and put it in my mouth. But oh disaster, disaster it was a peanut.
    Immediately there was reaction, perhaps by the allergens, everywhere appeared red papules and I could hardly breathe and was unable to take my examination, again I were rushed to the hospital and I got medication.

    And believe me or not, but everyone thought it was a panic attack for the oral examination, but that is not true, I had only eaten a harmless peanut.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,966 Inactive
    @Paulette

    It must have surprised your friend who had given you the peanut very much. But I guess none of your classmates had known about this symptom at the time. I'm glad that you have survived and dealt with the allergy, though it might never leave away from you.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 904 Inactive
    .

    I am allergic to cats

    but I love them

    .
  • prateekprateek Posts: 243 Inactive
    I am allergic to politicians. It doesn't matter how hard I must try but they easily make me pissed off.

    @Paulette @jackelliot @takafromtokyo
  • mohit_singhmohit_singh Posts: 2,059 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2017
    I am not allergic to anything. So, any peanuts for me please? I love peanuts, especially with spices. @paulette. Few politicians are good as well. Don't be allergic to them.You can love them or loathe them but can't ignore them @prateek and trust me in my family there is no one involved in politics.So, I am not partial here. ;);):D

    Are you allergic to something? @takafromtokyo @jackelliot
  • mohit_singhmohit_singh Posts: 2,059 ✭✭✭✭

    Here's one little story that I'd like to share with you.



    I was on a elevator with my family one day. The elevator moved up and stopped, and the door opened.



    I was the first to get off. When I got off, two people got on in exchange, and when I looked back, the rest of my family was still inside, kind of trapped at the back of the car. I got a little upset, especially to my family for not paying enough attention and how stupid they were to be so slow to get off.



    I said to my family, "Hurry up, you guys!", and my wife seemed to try to say something back at me, but unfortunately, the doors just closed on her. I had no choice but to watch them carried away to the next floor.



    I turned away from the doors of the elavator that were now being closed, and I was looking at an unfamiliar sight, and I realized that I had gotten off at the wronf floor.



    Turns out my wife was trying to tell me that I had to get back on the elevator.

    OMG! It has given me instant laugh. You are funny @takafromtokyo :D:D:D:D !

    How dare you do that? :D:D
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,445 ✭✭✭✭
    I used to be allergic to feathers, but don't seem to be any more. Similarly I was allergic to cat fur but overcame it by just persevering till it went away. I wish I could say the same for dust though. Or maybe I don't want to persevere too much with this one!
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,966 Inactive
    @mheredge @jackelliot @mohit_singh @prateek

    I used to have no problem with cats and dogs...until last night. Last night, I was walking around in a pet shop with my daughter. There were many kittens and puppies, and they were all cute as usual. But last night, I suddenly realized some allergic symptoms showing up on me. I had never been allergic to them, so I kept telling me that this was not allergy; it can't be allergy. But in the end, I had to conclude it was allergy, and we went out the shop.

    I'm so sad to make such a debut..
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 25,820 mod
    edited March 2017
    @takafromtokyo said:

    "It must have surprised your friend who had given you the peanut very much. But I guess none of your classmates had known about this symptom at the time. I'm glad that you have survived and dealt with the allergy, though it might never leave away from you."

    Indeed Taka nobody knew that allergy and I therefore do not even thought about it because of the stress of exams was too large. But my friend and many others classmates were very alert at the moment and assist directly.

    Thank you for your concern. ;)
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod

    @GemmaRowlands

    Just imagine what would it be like to have your office in one of those skyscrapers. You'll be walking in and working in there every day, and sometimes you'll probably have a windy day or a stormy day! Or, maybe you might even have to work overtime with no one around with you!

    I'm not sure I would really like that very much. I know that tall buildings sway in the wind, and I am certain that I would be able to feel it, and that I would be very afraid of the possibility that the building might come down.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,966 Inactive
    @GemmaRowlands

    Can you believe some people want to live in high buildings? Actually the apartment houses in such high buildings in Japan are more expensive than those in the middle or lower floors. But it takes a lot of time just to go up to your house or just to get down from your house. And once the power goes out, you're in real trouble, but still they're sold at high prices. It's a mystery!
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,445 ✭✭✭✭
    What about the view @takafromtokyo? And isn't usually quieter too? But in a country where earthquakes are a possible risk, no thank you.

    I was surprised to read there was a r point something earthquake in Switzerland today, not very far from Zurich.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,966 Inactive
    @mheredge

    Well, yes, I think the view would be great at the higher floor. And I think it must be quieter. Plus, you won't have too many mosquitoes and bees.
    Those are certainly good points.

    But I've seen on TV people who just couldn't get back to their own room once they got down because of too many stairs that they had to go back up after an earthquake made the elevator out of work. The real estate guys never talk about such troubles when they recommend you a house.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod

    @GemmaRowlands



    Can you believe some people want to live in high buildings? Actually the apartment houses in such high buildings in Japan are more expensive than those in the middle or lower floors. But it takes a lot of time just to go up to your house or just to get down from your house. And once the power goes out, you're in real trouble, but still they're sold at high prices. It's a mystery!

    I wouldn't feel safe living there myself. I think if I wasn't so afraid it would be great, as the views must be fantastic. But I don't think I would ever be able to feel safe.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 877 ✭✭✭✭
    @takafromtokyo @GemmaRowlands @mheredge
    My company's office takes up several floors in the twenty-story buildings, not consecutively from the 6th to the 20th floor. So every time an earthquake happens, we talk about how the shake was like at their floor to each other. Sometimes it's ridiculous that people in higher floors intensely speak about how the sway was terrible, as if they are bragging it.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,966 Inactive
    @Yellowtail
    Your story reminds me of my colleague's story.

    He wasn't at the office when that big earthquake occurred in 2011. He was on the train running along the river, and he was looking at the buildings lined up on the other side of the river. He said he couldn't believe his eyes when he saw all the tall buildings shaking like soft standing marshmallows, swaying right and left.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,445 ✭✭✭✭
    The first time I experienced an earthquake I was sitting in a ground floor office and didn't even feel it. But even one floor up, colleagues felt it quite a lot and things rattled on the table @Yellowtail and @takafromtokyo.

    When I was staying in the 10th floor apartment in Kathmandu more often than not the power was out when I returned to the place in the evening, so I used to have to ask security to turn on the generator just for a couple of minutes so the lift could take me up!
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod

    @takafromtokyo @GemmaRowlands @mheredge

    My company's office takes up several floors in the twenty-story buildings, not consecutively from the 6th to the 20th floor. So every time an earthquake happens, we talk about how the shake was like at their floor to each other. Sometimes it's ridiculous that people in higher floors intensely speak about how the sway was terrible, as if they are bragging it.

    I don't think I would brag about it if I were on the higher floor, I would just be happy that I was safe. Though I suppose it is just important to trust the people who built the buildings, as lots of modern buildings are designed specifically to withstand earthquakes.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,966 Inactive
    @mheredge
    It's a good thing that the security at your apartment knew how to run the generator.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 877 ✭✭✭✭
    @takafromtokyo
    That must be a terrible sight! But probably it's the sign of earthquake-proof structure. I heard flexible structure makes buildings resistant to earthquake.

    @mheredge
    Wasn't there a staircase in the apartment? You should take advantage of opportunities for exercise!

    @GemmaRowlands
    You're right. We almost don't have to worry about collapse of the building, unless it is too old. But still things in the building, such as furniture, can attack on you when a strong earthquake happens.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,445 ✭✭✭✭
    I used to use the stairs going down whether or not the power was working @Yellowtail but I'm afraid ten floors up were a bit much, especially when I usually had shopping to carry up. I live on the third floor of a building without a lift, on a hill, so I get plenty of exercise.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod


    @GemmaRowlands

    You're right. We almost don't have to worry about collapse of the building, unless it is too old. But still things in the building, such as furniture, can attack on you when a strong earthquake happens.

    True. Don't you get information about how to deal with things like that though? I thought earthquake survival was taught in schools?
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,445 ✭✭✭✭
    I think they've only started teaching earthquake drill in schools in India fairly recently. They've been doing it for years in New Zealand though @GemmaRowlands.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 877 ✭✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands
    We are taught that we should crawl under the desk soon when an earthquake happens, not to be hit by something falling.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    mheredge said:

    I think they've only started teaching earthquake drill in schools in India fairly recently. They've been doing it for years in New Zealand though @GemmaRowlands.

    I think it's a good thing to do, though. In fact, I think it's useful information in any school - particularly in an age where so many people travel to different places.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 42,445 ✭✭✭✭
    I read up about it as after I felt my first tremor in 2008 @GemmaRowlands. Even though I didn't feel it, all my colleagues did and rushed out of the building. I was left inside wondering why a bell was being rung.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    mheredge said:

    I read up about it as after I felt my first tremor in 2008 @GemmaRowlands. Even though I didn't feel it, all my colleagues did and rushed out of the building. I was left inside wondering why a bell was being rung.

    That must have been strange to be the only one not to feel anything! I have never really felt any major earthquakes, as we don't tend to have them here, but you do feel the odd tremor every now and again.
Sign In or Register to comment.