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Monday Night Owls - 2 October 2017 - Why the ´skip intro´ feature is bad for classic films

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 965 Teacher
edited October 2017 in Films, TV and Theatre
We read an article talking about a new feature on Netflix - skipping the opening credits in TV programs and films - and why this is bad news for classic films:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/may/15/netflix-skip-intro-feature-classic-films

Vocabulary Top 10:

opening credits - a list of the most prominent people involved in a television broadcast or film, shown at the beginning of the program

shush - to tell someone to be quiet; also can be used to tell someone to be quiet

cinephilia - a passionate interest in cinema, film theory, and film criticism

rolled out - launch or release; offered or sold for the first time

binging - to eat, drink, etc., too much in a short period of time; in this context, to watch multiple episodes of one program in a row

tight-lipped - not willing to speak about something

perfunctory - used to describe something that is done without energy or enthusiasm because of habit or because it is expected

riffed - something improvised related to a single subject; to talk about a particular subject in usually a quick and lively way

carry the torch - to support or promote a cause in an enthusiastic way

inimitable - impossible to copy or imitate


Do you like watching the opening credits of a movie?

What is your favourite opening to a movie?

Comments

  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    I always watch the opening credits of a movie and also of every TV series.
    I know that in TV series the opening credits are always the same, but they give often a summary of the previous episode or they lift a corner of the veil of the new episode.
    I don't want to miss them actually. It's one of the important parts of the story.

    The closing credit on the other hand is another story.
    I like watching the closing credits as well but when I am watching a film in the cinema, I've got the impression that I don't have any chance to watch the closing credit because all of the people will already stand up and leave the hall.
    It's sometimes very long and boring, but it's also always accompanied by a beautiful music, so it could be worth watching.
    When I'm watching a film on TV, many times they cut this part and start already with adds or another announcements.
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 965 Teacher
    You´re right @april , they have been cutting the end credits of movies (and even TV shows) on TV for a long time now! This isn´t really something new! :D

    I like to stay until the end of the closing credits when I go to see a film in the cinema too - sometimes they reward you by adding in an extra scene, or some bloopers, to make them more interesting. But I always feel the pressure to leave because everyone else is leaving!
  • BassaBassa Posts: 97 ✭✭✭
    Hi @NatashaT , I have to be onest saing that I don't like so much opening credits because I'm not a very patient person as they say :)...but there're few movies I liked opening credits as "Fight Club" or "Robin Hood" with Kevin kostner, "Catch me if you can" as well is very funny...

    Anyway despite I'm not a petient person there are a lot of people very patient in this world and I think they've the right to watch if they're interested.... as I think, try to eliminate, as Netflix is doing, the opening and closing credits of a movie or TV series, is not respectul to them who have worked on the creation of the movie itself...
    Would be like if when you have been very busy, you've given all yourself for a project, for a work, nobody had come to say you THANKS...
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,861 ✭✭✭✭✭
    An interesting topic! I wanted to join it, but couldn't wake up.:(
  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 1,849 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think that opening credits are necessary, especially when you're going to be seated at the cinema, to fully enjoy your movie.
    On the one hand it's kind of a silent applause the all audience owe to the crew and actors who have made it possible for you to pass two hours of entertainment and amusment: often even cultural enrichment.
    On the other hand, while the credits are slowly scrolling down the screen, the theme song is pervading the hall, the lights gradually turn off, you manage, little by little, to abstract yourself from the outside daily reality.
    Your mind needs to enter in sintony with the movie director's one, doing it to set aside your convictions of a life, your biases, or perhaps just your concerns if you're going to watch a funny comedy.
    You need to put off a bit of inner self too.
    You need to get wholly absorbed in the movie, at least throughout the span it lasts.
    It's like the director's hand waving and beckoning you into getting along together, sharing a short path of life.
    Hereinafter, he seems to be warning you, you will experience any kind of feelings, as it's the case with any pieces of life though.
    You'll go through ups and downs. You'll get in a bliss sometimes. But you'll also probably experience adversities which will have you almost on the edge of helpless despair.
    I think opening credits do that: sort of minds connection between watcher and director.
    Therefore, in my opinion, skipping intro is equivalent to accompany yourself with a partner without both having decided to do away with a bit of self-absorption.
    Either with movies or relationships, I believe, the outcome of magic and poetry is spoiled by skipping intro.


    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 965 Teacher
    @filauzio I agree - I think that the opening credits give you time to forget about whatever you were doing just before, or forget about whatever else is happening in your life, so you can really immerse yourself in the film. I also think that if they just jumped straight into the film, you would probably miss some important information about the characters or the story, because your full attention isn´t on the screen.

    @Bassa made a very good point, too - it´s a little disrespectful to all the people who spent so long making the movie to just ignore them! Imagine if one of those people were sitting in the cinema, so excited to see their name up there for everyone to see, and when it happens, they look around the cinema to see everyone talking, or checking their phone... you would feel pretty disappointed I think!
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