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Do you have a secret British accent? Quiz

mheredgemheredge TeacherHere and therePosts: 36,557 mod
We all know that Brits speak differently depending on where they’re from. But just how differently? And even if you’re a non-British English speaker, might you share some vocabulary or pronunciations with people hailing from a UK region?

Find out with the quiz below. Inspired by academic research on accents and dialects, it tests which region of the UK has locals that speak the most like you – even if you’re not British.

Are you a match for Hugh Grant, Cheryl or Ewan McGregor? Your geographic home may be far from the UK, but your linguistic home may be anywhere from Edinburgh to Belfast, London to the Lake District.

(Those who have heard me speak can guess who I'm supposed to sound like!)


http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180205-which-british-accent-is-closest-to-your-own


The Scottish advert is worth listening to if you want to hear a Scottish accent!

Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,899 mod
    It's amazing at just how many different accents there are within Britain. They sound so different, yet they are all still "British" accents.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    Did you try the quiz @GemmaRowlands? So far all my friends (from all over the country) reckon they have the same result.

    Do you say scons or scones?
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,527 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2018
    >You sound like you're from Sunderland.
    Hm...
  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 1,972 ✭✭✭✭✭
    This is my result - You sound like you're from West London (Kate Winslet, Hugh Grant). Hm...
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    Bravo @Practical_Severard - you seem to be the only person so far to buck the system and have an accent that isn't a Southerner's accent from the Home Countries.

  • VokVok Posts: 1,060 ✭✭✭
    'You sound like you're from West London.'
    Shut the front door
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,527 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2018
    > @mheredge said:
    > Bravo @Practical_Severard - you seem to be the only person so far to buck the system and have an accent that isn't a Southerner's accent from the Home Countries.

    So I couldn't pretend I'm a member the British high class :( I wish I had the plum accent.

    This one is really tough:
  • VokVok Posts: 1,060 ✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard I beg even a native speaker would ask for subtitles for this.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    I could catch about half, but I'd be saying 'pardon' and 'could you say that again' at least to the first farmer. The commentator is fine, and the second farmer was just about okay @Vok.

    Try this for size @Vok and @Practical_Severard. They had subtitles in English showing for the first 20 minutes or so, just for us Sasanachs to get used to the accent. Glaswegian is tough to understand.

    (Sweet Sixteen (2002) - Ken Loach movie)

  • VokVok Posts: 1,060 ✭✭✭
    Hard one to follow, this one @mheredge . So strange to see the actor from 'Line of Duty' to be so young and speak like that.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    There is another series of Line of Duty in the offing @Vok, but not till next year, unfortunately. This is another series I like.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,060 ✭✭✭
    Yes, I know @mheredge . I'm looking forward to watching the next season of 'Line of Duty'. I feel it a bit unfair to keep us waiting for so long.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    There's another series of The Handmaiden coming out soon too @Vok.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,060 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge Do you mean 'The Handmaid's Tale'? I haven't heard of this series.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    Sorry, I was being lazy and didn't write the title in full @Vok. Yes, I meant The Handmaid's Tale. This series is an add-on as the author has only been consulted - she didn't write a sequel to the original story that was published in the 1980s.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,527 ✭✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:

    > Try this for size @Vok and @Practical_Severard. They had subtitles in English showing for the first 20 minutes or so, just for us Sasanachs to get used to the accent. Glaswegian is tough to understand.
    >
    > (Sweet Sixteen (2002) - Ken Loach movie)

    I can grasp single words of the dialogues which are not enough to understand it. The narrator is no problem.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    Don't worry, I think most of the English audience found the film very challenging to understand @Practical_Severard. By the end of the movie, I was just starting to get used to it, but the first 20 minutes without the subtitles, I was a bit lost.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,527 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2018
    > @mheredge said:
    > Don't worry, I think most of the English audience found the film very challenging to understand @Practical_Severard. By the end of the movie, I was just starting to get used to it, but the first 20 minutes without the subtitles, I was a bit lost.

    I normally understand every single word of a documentary or a live record of a university lecture, well enough American TV series but British ones are harder, they have lots of specific British words (e.g. 'daft', 'nick', 'quid', 'lad/lass') and the pronunciation differs, sometimes much, from the standard variant. Sometimes their characters speak faster than I can read the subtitles.

    The key to the problem is simple practicing, and I've already notably improved my listening skills.

    An interesting thing that characters often use words tagged in a dictionary as 'vulgar slang' without being beeped out (and I've picked up some). But a language learner doesn't feel their obscenity while well may miss the note in a dictionary.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    Americans use the English language in a much more simplistic way @Practical_Severard. For example, when I watch American films dubbed to French, I understand everything said very easily. However I struggle more with British films dubbed from the British English, as the way that language is used is more sophisticated. Then depending on the French film I'm watching, then it's more a question of speed. If they are speaking too fast and with lots of argot (slang), then I might find it a bit harder to follow. News and documentaries are fine though.

    How strange you say vulgar words are sensored though. I have never come across this.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,527 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2018
    > @mheredge said:
    > Americans use the English language in a much more simplistic way @Practical_Severard. For example, when I watch American films dubbed to French, I understand everything said very easily. However I struggle more with British films dubbed from the British English, as the way that language is used is more sophisticated.
    Interesting. I'd add that English is a very variative language, probably, because there's not a national school curriculum.

    Then depending on the French film I'm watching, then it's more a question of speed. If they are speaking too fast and with lots of argot (slang), then I might find it a bit harder to follow. News and documentaries are fine though.
    >
    Yes, same with me. Listening is a skill obtained with practicing and there are easier and tougher instances, e.g. noisy situations. When someone not knowing a language is listening to something in this language he thinks that he hears single words in the mother tongue. This is the brain's listening centres' work. They've been trained to recognise the mother tongue in the early childhood and they're trying do it in this situation. When learning a foreign language one needs to have come through the toddlership again.

    > How strange you say vulgar words are sensored though. I have never come across this.

    I may have worded it badly @mheredge , I've meant the opposite. Their using of vulgar slang is a certain challenge to a learner since the dictionary tags may be easily overlooked.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    I have to say that there are some American films I find difficult to follow, especially when the actors mumble their words and there's lots of background noise.

    I know what you mean about vulgar or even obscene words @Practical_Severard. As I rarely ever use them in my own language, there were never words I was particularly curious about and so I'm not so likely to know them unless I see the translation in subtitles!
  • ech0panditech0pandit Posts: 221 ✭✭
    You sound like you're from West London.
    These are the celebrities you sound most like:
    Kate Winslet
    KATE WINSLET
    (Actor)
    Hugh Grant
    HUGH GRANT
    (Actor)
    Hugh Laurie
    HUGH LAURIE
    (Actor)

    LOL.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    Me too @ech0pandit but then they are only a few miles out (I was born just east of London). I'm so glad that they didn't say that I sounded like an Essex girl! That said, Kate Winslet has what I'd call an Estuary accent (as in slight London), but Hugh Grant is much more well-spoken.
  • ech0panditech0pandit Posts: 221 ✭✭
    Yes I'd agree with you on Hugh Grant but I really don't know about Kate Winslet and until recently I found out that Hugh Laurie is a Brit haha, they are so great at acting I didn't focus on their accent though.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,557 mod
    A classmate of mine lives in west London but grew up in Essex. She reckons that there isn't any difference between the east and west of London, as after the Second World War a lot of Cockneys moved out of the East End which had been badly bombed, and settled in the suburbs, taking their accent with them. I think I can tell a difference - though no always as people move around, and I can usually tell the difference between south of the river (south of the River Thames) and north of the river.
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