Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

"The April rain, the April rain,
Comes slanting down in fitful showers,
Then from the furrow shoots the grain,
And banks are fledged with nestling flowers;
And in grey shawl and woodland bowers
The cuckoo through the April rain
Calls once again."

Mathilde Blind, April Rain
April
When you first apply to join the forum, you will have to wait a while to be approved. Just be patient.

Once you are a member, don't forget to check the calendar(s) for session times. Sessions are held on different platforms, so be sure to find out where the session will take place:-

Speaking Practice

LEN English sessions:-
http://www.learnenglish.de/calendar/learnenglishcalendar.html

Listening Practice 24/7

English radio playlists on Discord.

Mid life crisis anyone?

mheredgemheredge TeacherHere and therePosts: 37,349 mod
"I think I am perpetually in a midlife crisis,” is the observation of Paul, 52.

'Midlife' is an elastic concept, as it probably depends on the person when this happens. (I can identify with Paul, having had what might be seen as a midlife crisis since aged 30!)

Have you ever suddenly decided to change direction? Or are you doubting what and where you are at your particular stage in life? These are possible symptoms of this too common phenomena!

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/lostinshowbiz/2018/apr/05/the-great-british-tv-chefs-rotating-midlife-crisis?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=270286&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2


«1345

Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,119 mod
    I think there are three crisis stages in life -

    Quarter life (where we question our direction, and whether we have done the right thing, usually at the beginning of our career)

    Mid life (usually around 50, with a decade or so before retirement, being confused about what we have achieved, and whether it was all we hoped)

    End life (usually at the age of 70/80 where we look back at life and see whether we are fulfilled, and if there is anything we could have done better).

    I am certain that I have had a quarter life crisis. But I think I am more settled and out of it now.
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 19,969 mod
    @mheredge I dare to say I had a midlife crisis, it was around the millenium time, a few children left the house, my first grandaughter was born, and I lost meself because I thought; "What have I reached in life, did I well? At the time, I even changed my looks (haircut and clothes)and I wanted more, and I did an exam to become the headmaster at my school and I succeeded. I am very lucky now as a retired lady and I still hope to be able to accomplish much for all people I love.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    I never thought of it as a quarter life crisis @GemmaRowlands, though this is a really good way to describe it. Maybe I had a few of these!

    @Paulette I wouldn't call it a midlife crisis when at 43 I quit the UK, but more an escape to freedom!
  • VokVok Posts: 1,126 ✭✭✭
    Probably I'm still young to have a middle-age crisis, but I sometimes question myself whether the path chosen is the right one and maybe I should do something different, more meaningful. Then I think that there's no guarantee that I won't think the same way once a different path taken. Let the cobbler stick to his last.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    Don't worry @Vok, you're definitely not missing out if you haven't yet had your midlife crisis yet.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,119 mod
    mheredge said:

    I never thought of it as a quarter life crisis @GemmaRowlands, though this is a really good way to describe it. Maybe I had a few of these!

    @Paulette I wouldn't call it a midlife crisis when at 43 I quit the UK, but more an escape to freedom!

    Yes, I have read articles about it, and it would seem that the quarter life crisis really is a thing that a lot of people go through!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    I think I have had quarter, third, mid life and countless other crises truth be known @GemmaRowlands - from changing career at 25, and again at 30; from changing life in the county to central London; to changing country and direction again and again.... In fact life might be rather boring without change.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,119 mod
    mheredge said:

    I think I have had quarter, third, mid life and countless other crises truth be known @GemmaRowlands - from changing career at 25, and again at 30; from changing life in the county to central London; to changing country and direction again and again.... In fact life might be rather boring without change.

    Yes I agree with you there - but there are many (myself included) who find change rather unsettling, even though it is certainly for the best in the long term.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    I agree change can be a bit scary, but when the status quo isn't that wonderful, then this makes doing something different more appealing @GemmaRowlands. And sometimes the temporary works out to be so good that it becomes long term!
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,119 mod
    mheredge said:

    I agree change can be a bit scary, but when the status quo isn't that wonderful, then this makes doing something different more appealing @GemmaRowlands. And sometimes the temporary works out to be so good that it becomes long term!

    Yes that is very true. I know that there is a big change that I need to make in my life at the moment; I just need to be brave enough to do it.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    Go for it @GemmaRowlands!
  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 1,981 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ha I think my crisis is not that of middle age but rather that of the pre-Internet communist era. Had I been say 10 years younger I would have had access to better-quality education. :'(

    Well, memories of rotting at bad school are rather depressive.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    I am never sure how important school is to someone who really wants to learn @Xanthippe. Obviously these days the pieces of paper that go with qualifications have become more important, but I am not convinced this proves anything either.
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 19,969 mod
    @mheredge you are quite right you can't find the qualifications of people on their certifications, it is their attitude, their driving power and effort that people make who they are in life.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,126 ✭✭✭
    @Xanthippe I'm not even convinced that with the onset of the Internet the quality of education has risen. The focus has probably been shifted from rote learning and regurgitation to testing, but I'm not sure that the Internet can be held responsible for that. Anyway, easier it may be, but better it is not.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,119 mod
    mheredge said:

    I am never sure how important school is to someone who really wants to learn @Xanthippe. Obviously these days the pieces of paper that go with qualifications have become more important, but I am not convinced this proves anything either.

    It annoys me that so much rides on pieces of paper. But then I suppose how else do you measure achievement to gain entry into college, university etc.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    The Tory government has always been supportive of selective schools in Britain and recently announced funding for this minority of schools where children have to pass an exam at 11 to gain entry to these more academic grammar schools. This is in the face of countless studies that demonstrate how divisive this system is. The comprehensive schools were set up to solve this, but in some areas of the country never quite succeeded.

    I think that it is very sad that almost everywhere the education system has turned more into a sausage machine, pushing students through the exam system without really providing what is useful in life and a good all round education. Worse still, in the UK, students have to chose a limited number of subjects to continue studying after 16, not like the baccalaureate that continues with a broader spectrum of subjects up to university.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,119 mod
    mheredge said:

    The Tory government has always been supportive of selective schools in Britain and recently announced funding for this minority of schools where children have to pass an exam at 11 to gain entry to these more academic grammar schools. This is in the face of countless studies that demonstrate how divisive this system is. The comprehensive schools were set up to solve this, but in some areas of the country never quite succeeded.

    I think that it is very sad that almost everywhere the education system has turned more into a sausage machine, pushing students through the exam system without really providing what is useful in life and a good all round education. Worse still, in the UK, students have to chose a limited number of subjects to continue studying after 16, not like the baccalaureate that continues with a broader spectrum of subjects up to university.

    There is a lot that is wrong with our education system, and I've always thought that kids are limited with what they are able to do.
  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 1,981 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Well, it is not about a piece of paper. For example, to learn how to think mathematically you really need a good teacher. :)

    @Vok, hm I don't agree with you: I have taken a lot of physics and maths courses (Stanford, Penn, etc). It wouldn't have been possible for me otherwise. :) Yes, I do miss personal assistance, in particular with writing proofs. But I have found a physics forum. There you can present your work and many knowledgeable guys are eager to help to find weak points and mistakes.
    So I do think the Internet makes education better but you have to know how to use it. :)
    What is annoying is that there are fewer and fewer genuinely free platforms. Coursera is not free any more, even exercises are behind the pay wall.
  • DeucalionDeucalion Posts: 1,090 ✭✭✭✭
    What is that physics forum, @Xanthippe ? Is it for scientific people only? Could you provide the link to it?
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 19,969 mod
    @Deucalion you are right there are many courses via distance learning on the Internet, but they are usually very expensive.
    Here in Belgium I follow a course in art and history at the Open University via the internet. The advantage is that you are accompanied, but because of the high prices many competent young people sometimes can not participate and I find that very unfortunate.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,126 ✭✭✭
    edited May 2018
    I see where you're coming from @Xanthippe and you're right too. What you're saying is that the Internet has given you this opportunity to find the information you could only dream about before. However it doesn't mean that this information, all of which is a click of a button away now, didn't exist before. Those knowledgeable guys you are referring to were there for sure before, we couldn't just reach them. As I mentioned it's become easier to find information provided that you're acutely aware of what you're looking for.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    @Deucalion Harvard and MIT have free courses, though I doubt that they provide much more than course material to get on with yourself.

    I agree with @Xanthippe that some subjects like mathematics benefit from having a good teacher. Unfortunately I never had any really good math teachers after primary school when I had one who was really inspiring. But other subjects like history, I think it helps but isn't so essential. I had the most boring teacher at school but as I was interested in the subject, it didn't really matter.
  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 1,981 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 2018
    @Deucalion, here you have it: https://www.physicsforums.com/

    I often use it if I am stuck. :) But I don't reveal my age. ;) They think perhaps: poor college girl, let's help her. :) :)
    Thanks to them, I gain deeper understanding.

    @Vok, yeah, I still remember the times of isolation: martial law in Poland. It was difficult to find an English teacher. :(
    One of my uncles (physics professor) studied physics in the US but only because his father-in-law maintained good contacts with the communist party. This father-in-law, distinguished physicist was even a deputy in the parliament so he had sold his soul to the devil to make a career. :(
    Both were very good but they had to compromise.
  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 1,981 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Deucalion, for example, they explained a concept of negative radius very well. Sometimes I think my questions are silly but it turns out that they aren't. Exercises in MIT courses are often very tricky be design. That's why I love them. :)
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 904 Inactive
    @Xanthippe

    too many are getting into a negative radius from using Facebook

    jackelliot.over-blog.com/2018/05/anger-spread-by-facebook.html

    A crisis indeed
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 37,349 mod
    I suppose it depends what people use Facebook for. Sharing holiday snaps or things that might be of interest to friends is one thing @jackelliot, but taking anything too seriously on Facebook is quite another thing.
  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 1,981 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @jackelliot, if a radius is negative the point lands in the opposite quadrant - it is plus or minus pi so it wouldn't be bad for Facebook friends - they wouldn't meet :D
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,119 mod
    mheredge said:

    I suppose it depends what people use Facebook for. Sharing holiday snaps or things that might be of interest to friends is one thing @jackelliot, but taking anything too seriously on Facebook is quite another thing.

    People use Facebook for everything, that's the problem. The amount of oversharing that occurs is unreal.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 904 Inactive
    @GemmaRowlands

    oversharing might be the problem
Sign In or Register to comment.