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War on plastic

mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
Have you seen any stories on the war on plastic?

I saw this one about how the NHS is going back to using china cups and saucers rather than plastic cups.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/04/11/nhs-returns-china-cups-saucers-war-disposable-cups/?utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter


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Comments

  • VokVok Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge This video of a diver swimming through a staggering amount of plastic has knocked me sideways. I'm glad to know that NHS is trying to make a difference.

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod
    I think it is great that the NHS are doing that, as there is far too much plastic waste. Everyone should try to cut back on the amount that they are using.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands I don't buy plastic bags from a supermarket and bring mine every time I go shopping, which has taken a lot of wear and tear already.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod
    Vok said:

    @GemmaRowlands I don't buy plastic bags from a supermarket and bring mine every time I go shopping, which has taken a lot of wear and tear already.

    Yes, I do the same. I will buy one occasionally, as mine do sometimes tear, but they last for a long time.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    I take cloth bags with me as spare bags when I go shopping. I sometimes have a few plastic bags, but just to wrap wet or cold things.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭
    Apparently Australia is undergoing a plastic crisis at the moment. The most remote parts of Australia that supposed to be pristine and crystal clean are badly effected too. Plastic is ubiquitous. The impingement on wildlife is yet to be determined but one thing is certain already, it's high time we were more careful with the usage of plastic.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/16/plastic-is-literally-everywhere-the-epidemic-attacking-australias-oceans
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    I think everywhere is starting to realise how serious the plastic problem is @Vok.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭
    Just to give you the idea of how much plastic each of us use per year here is a good article on that. Although I don't think I use that much, I'm dumbfounded by the amount to be frank with you. Having seen such a staggering amount of the plastic waste produced by one person you can't help it but wanting to cut down on your consumption. Indeed it's easier to take in the scale of the problem when it's shown on the example of one consumer rather than get you head around a vague amount of plastic waste expressed in hundreds of tons.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/17/i-kept-all-my-plastic-year-4490-items-forced-rethink
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,749 ✭✭✭✭
    Isn't plastic recycled? I think it gets shredded and reused e.g. for making insulation.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard I suppose they can't keep up with the amount of plastic waiting to be recycled.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭
    Incidentally, only 56 items from 4490 collected by this guy from the article I shared above turned out to be made from recycled material.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    Nowadays more plastic is being recycled but I think this is only a more recent development. I don't think I am aware of much that is recycled plastic in France. In Nepal they are only starting to recycle it as before they didn't have the means to do it and used to send it to India. I have seen plastic waste being made into plastic water containers in Chitwan, an area of Nepal where they have quite a lot of waste not only from local people but tourists too.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod
    mheredge said:

    I take cloth bags with me as spare bags when I go shopping. I sometimes have a few plastic bags, but just to wrap wet or cold things.

    I have cloth bags too but I do carry some plastic bags to put raw meat in, as I like to throw those bags away afterwards.. even though I'm sure the meat was safely in its packet.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    Yes it's always useful to have a plastic bag to wrap stuff that might leak and make a mess. In particular I like to make sure I don't have any accidents with yoghurt @GemmaRowlands.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod
    mheredge said:

    Yes it's always useful to have a plastic bag to wrap stuff that might leak and make a mess. In particular I like to make sure I don't have any accidents with yoghurt @GemmaRowlands.

    Yeah I have had a few "exploding" yoghurts before now! I am quite picky when it comes to food hygiene, so I always have to make sure that everything is stored and transported in the best possible way.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    I was too efficient in refusing plastic bags so now we have a few things to take back with us, I've had to be quite inventive with using the bits of paper and foil to wrap things. Most of the things I have are in glass bottles or jars, which is okay except for the weight! I use jars at home a lot all the time.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    This is a good move, though I am not sure it should just be voluntary.

    'UK supermarkets and food companies launched a new voluntary pledge to cut plastic packaging on Thursday as ministers consider forcing them to pay more towards collecting and recycling the waste they produce.'

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/26/uk-supermarkets-launch-voluntary-pledge-to-cut-plastic-packaging?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=272759&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

    Kenya is showing zero-tolerance to plastic.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/25/nairobi-clean-up-highs-lows-kenyas-plastic-bag-ban


  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    Over the last 10 years, we have produced more plastic than all of the 20th century. The video here shows how our trash and plastic ends up in the oceans and the impact it’s having on the environment.

    https://globalnews.ca/news/4269163/plastic-pollution-waste-ocean/
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    Encouraging news. A production line in Wales is to make paper straws for McDonald’s and other restaurants. Maybe they should make this an export business. The world needs less plastic straws.

    https://theguardian.com/business/2018/jun/17/paper-straw-factory-to-open-in-britain-as-restaurants-ditch-plastic-mcdonalds?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=278369&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2


  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod
    mheredge said:

    Encouraging news. A production line in Wales is to make paper straws for McDonald’s and other restaurants. Maybe they should make this an export business. The world needs less plastic straws.

    https://theguardian.com/business/2018/jun/17/paper-straw-factory-to-open-in-britain-as-restaurants-ditch-plastic-mcdonalds?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=278369&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2


    That is good news, and I hope that a lot of other companies will follow their lead, too. It will make a big difference in the long term I think.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    Whoever is manufacturing these paper straws, I applaud and hope that they will be very successful @GemmaRowlands
  • VokVok Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge I wonder if these paper straw will have the same quality as plastic. If not we still should compromise for the sake of environment. I hope they're going to be commonplace soon not only in McDonald's and especially in Asia.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    I remember using paper straws in the past and never had any problem with them. If anything, sometimes plastic ones have holes that impair their performance @Vok.

    I was amused by an article that was advising on how to retain youthful looks. It said don't drink with straws as this make you pucker you mouth and causes wrinkles!

    In fact there are quite a few reasons why it is not a good idea to drink with a straw.

    https://littlethings.com/dangers-drinking-straw/




  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    These tips are useful if you want to reduce the amount of plastic you use @mustafatajani, @Vok, @Paulette.

    https://myplasticfreelife.com/plasticfreeguide/

    (I have to say I am guilty of quite a few of these).

    1 Carry reusable shopping bags.
    2 Give up bottled water.
    3 Carry your own containers for take out food and leftovers.
    4 Carry a stainless steel travel mug or water bottle at all times for coffee and other drinks while out in the world.
    5 Carry reusable utensils and glass drinking straws.
    6 When ordering pizza, say no to the little plastic “table” in the middle of the pizza box.
    7 Treat yourself to an ice cream cone.
    8 Cut out sodas, juices, and all other plastic-bottled beverages.
    9 Buy fresh bread that comes in either paper bags or no bags.
    10 Return containers for berries, cherry tomatoes, etc. to the farmer’s market to be reused.
    11 Bring your own container for meat and prepared foods.
    12 Choose milk in returnable glass bottles.
    13 Buy large wheels of unwrapped cheese.
    14 Try to choose only wine bottled in glass with natural cork stoppers.
    15 Let go of frozen convenience foods.
    16 Choose plastic-free chewing gum.
    17 Buy from bulk bins as often as possible.
    18 Say “no” to plastic produce bags.
    19 Shop your local farmers market.
    20 Clean with vinegar and water.
    21 Baking soda is a fantastic scouring powder.
    22 Use powdered dishwasher detergent in a cardboard box.
    23 Hand-wash dishes without plastic.
    24 Use natural cleaning cloths and scrubbers instead of plastic scrubbers and synthetic sponges.
    25 Wash laundry with homemade laundry soap and stain removers.

    The list goes on (100 tips).
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod
    mheredge said:

    Whoever is manufacturing these paper straws, I applaud and hope that they will be very successful @GemmaRowlands

    Yes, I am sure that the company in question will make their fortune, and considering what it is doing for the planet I would say the fortune is very much deserved.
  • MustafaMustafa Posts: 154 ✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > I take cloth bags with me as spare bags when I go shopping. I sometimes have a few plastic bags, but just to wrap wet or cold things.

    As you know plastic is banned in my city. I take cloth bag or jute bag whenever I go to market. @Vok @GemmaRowlands
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    After reading so much about how plastic recycling doesn't work very effectively, I am starting to doubt the sense of trying to separate it. I want to try harder to avoid it as much as I can instead.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod

    > @mheredge said:

    > I take cloth bags with me as spare bags when I go shopping. I sometimes have a few plastic bags, but just to wrap wet or cold things.



    As you know plastic is banned in my city. I take cloth bag or jute bag whenever I go to market. @Vok @GemmaRowlands

    I like those kinds of bags. I am trying to use them more, as it is a lot better than using plastic.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,129 ✭✭✭✭
    Today I was very pleased to see Carrefour seemed to have replaced the thin plastic bags for fruit and veg (they weigh it at the cash desk) for paper. Unless it's broken or unusable, I then reuse the paper bags at home - usually to put rubbish in - but still way better than using plastic.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,740 mod
    My local shop has now stopped supplying customers with plastic bags at all. They now only use paper bags which can be recycled, and I think that is very good news indeed.
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