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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February

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Particular dishes from your country

mheredgemheredge TeacherHere and therePosts: 36,162 mod
Every country has its local cuisine. The British like fish and chips, roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, mince pies and Christmas puddling at Christmas and all sorts of other dishes like shepherd's pie and apple crumble.

The French are famous for their frog legs, snails and foie gras, but also have a very long list of specialties like cassoulet, quiche, pissaladiere, boeuf Bourgignon and so on.

In Italy pasta and pizza may be famous, but there are many more specialities from the parma ham, Genovese pesto, Parmesan cheese, and so on.

What local dishes, particularly popular in your country do you like to eat and to cook?
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Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    In France, cou de canard farci, or duck neck stuffed with foie gras and duck meat (you can omit the foie gras) is a dish I came across. Stuffed duck neck is a delicacy in the south west of France and is often bought conserved in duck fat in jars.

    Stuffed poultry neck is not particular to France, and in Germany it is called helzel; in English, magel, in Hungarian halsli, and in Yiddish falsa kishke.

    Outside France, it is known as food for the poor as it is usually stuffed with inexpensive ingredients like bread, giblets and other inexpensive odds and end to stretch the meat as far as possible.

    The addition of foie gras in the French version makes it out of the reach of the poor. It can be eaten as a starter with green salad and/or potatoes fried in duck fat, but it could just as easily make a main course for lunch.


  • bleucielbleuciel Posts: 35 ✭✭
    edited May 2018
    In Morocco,there are a lot of local dishes as couscous,tajine of vegetables and meat,hrira (morocan soup),shobakia ,selou (we use selou and shobakia in ramadan,a sacrified month for muslims
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    What is harissa @bleuciel? What is this used in? I have seen it sold in Moroccan shops here in Nice.
  • bleucielbleuciel Posts: 35 ✭✭
    harissa contains tomatoes ,hot peppers.It is so hot and i love it
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I will have to try it @bleuciel. I enjoy spicy food.
  • mehranmehran Posts: 4
    > @bleuciel said:
    > In Morocco,there are a lot of local dishes as couscous,tajine of vegetables and meat,hrira (morocan soup),shobakia ,selou (we use selou and shobakia in ramadan,a sacrified month for muslims

    what is couscous?
  • mehranmehran Posts: 4
    edited May 2018
    > @bleuciel said:
    > harissa contains tomatoes ,hot peppers.It is so hot and i love it

    the name of this soup is like the name of Arabian foods
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    Is harissa a soup or a sauce @mehran and @bleuciel?
  • bleucielbleuciel Posts: 35 ✭✭
    It is a sauce.I like it specially with fish
  • bleucielbleuciel Posts: 35 ✭✭
    Yes .the name of harissa is arabic
  • bleucielbleuciel Posts: 35 ✭✭
    Couscous is made by seven vegetables,meat and semolina
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    Choux pastry is something the French like is many forms. I'm thinking I might try out this recipe later today.

    https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/11/french-in-a-flash-chouquettes-recipe.html
  • GuybrushGuybrush Posts: 14 ✭✭
    edited July 2018
    Near Milan, a tipical dish is risotto with pumpkin.
    Without writing down the whole recipe, the pumpkin is smashed in a puree and mixed with the rice cooked with a souté and broth, nuanced with white wine.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    @Guybrush this sounds delicious. I will have to try it out.

    I'm in Portugal now and like very much the various ways cod is used here. Tripe is also a local speciality and while normally this isn't something I like, I tried it once and found it very good.
  • GuybrushGuybrush Posts: 14 ✭✭
    @mheredge it really is if you find a good pumpkin (not the orange one).
    Tripe is tipical here in North Italy too! I love it: it is common specially in winter.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I didn't know this @Guybrush. I will have to try it some time when I go. I'm planning to stay a few weeks in Genoa in November, so maybe I can find it there.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I suppose it is quite typical, as I have quite a few times eaten fig jam or chutney with pates here in France. There is a tree in the garden and I picked up about 250g of figs that had fallen. I now have two pans going, one for some jam and the green figs, I have added to apple and onion to make some chutney.
  • GuybrushGuybrush Posts: 14 ✭✭
    Tripe is typical in North Italy, but it's a "farmer's food", so not so typical in seaside towns as Genoa.
    In Genoa you must try ligurian focaccia and "cima alla genovese" (a sort of meatloaf cut in slices).

    And... I know it might sound weird but real Genoese eat ligurian focaccia with cappuccino in the morning!
    Literally tranlated from what a genoese friend of mine once told me when I was astonished and asked about the oil and salt mixed with the milk and coffee: "that's the best part of it: warm focaccia and oil floating above the cappuccino surface".

    I then investigated and found out that's really a typical genoese habit, ignored by most Italians too.

    (That's really a long text without auto correctors, please point out every mistake with no mercy)
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    @Guybrush are you Italian? If so, where are you from? I have seen the focaccia in the baker shops but never gave it a second thought about when it might be eaten. It is so nice though, I can understand wanting to have it for breakfast.
    Guybrush said:

    Tripe is typical in North Italy, but it's a "farmer's food", so not so typical in seaside towns like Genoa.

    In Genoa you must try ligurian focaccia and "cima alla Genovese" (a sort of meatloaf cut in slices).



    And... I know it might sound weird but real Genoese eat Ligurian focaccia with cappuccino in the morning!

    Literally translated from what a Genoese friend of mine once told me when I was astonished and asked about the oil and salt mixed with the milk and coffee: "that's the best part of it: warm focaccia and oil floating above the cappuccino surface".



    I then investigated and found out that's really a typical Genoese habit, ignored by most Italians too.



    @filauzio do you eat focaccio for breakfast like this?
  • GuybrushGuybrush Posts: 14 ✭✭
    Yep, I'm from Milan. :)
    And you?

    (Also, really thank you for corrections!)
  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 1,851 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Well, I can't but totally subscribe what @Guybrush wrote about focaccia and cappuccino, @mheredge.

    Yes, as @Guybrush wrote, though focaccia is very oily and salty, the conflict between its taste and the sweet milk-and-coffee one, gives you an intense pleasure, as the rather crisp texture of the focaccia slowly melts in the hot milk.

    Nevertheless, I admit, the maximum of the pleasure you reach whenever you dip your 30 cm by 20 cm rectangular pieces of focaccia into your own wide mug in your kitchen.

    It's very enjoyable then, because, in a lighthearted childish manner, you may indulge yourself into spilling a few milk's drops over onto the table surface.
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I am definitely going to have to try this out when I am next in Genoa later in the year @filauzio and @Guybrush.

    Yesterday I found some goat milk in the local Carrefour and thought I'd try it out. It is delicious. I am totally convinced it is the right milk to make cappuccino though, as there is this tiny hint of 'goat' the lingers on the palate, but it is certainly very refreshing drunk cold out of the fridge and is much less fattening than cow's milk.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I couldn't work out whether to put this in the topic on what made me laugh today or here. However for cooking fans - Jamie Oliver in particular @Hermine, I thought maybe here was better.

    I couldn't help but laugh (or cry) that the media seems so challenged by Jamie Oliver's product called 'jerk rice.' An MP commented that it was misappropriation and there is a big hoohah over how rice can be 'jerk.'

    I think it is all part of a distraction conspircacy to stop us worrying about what isn't happening over Brexit!

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/aug/22/heres-the-main-issue-behind-the-jamie-oliver-jerk-rice-row-and-its-not-cultural-appropriation



    The short news video in this article is worth watching:
    https://metro.co.uk/2018/08/22/woman-spits-out-jamie-olivers-jerk-rice-as-food-war-wages-on-7868949/

  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,416 mod
    I like thiis guy and I admire him. Recently he gave an interwiev on radio where he spoke about his life. I'm following him since he was a young chef cooking in his privat home.

    I'm so sorry Marianne, but they don' t allow me to watch the video. I'll try to get it by youtube.



  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I like his recipes @Hermine as they are usually not too difficult and they're healthy.
  • GuybrushGuybrush Posts: 14 ✭✭
    I like many recipes of his.
    He has some really nice ideas for when you have little time to cook!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    edited September 2018
    Tonight I introduced my French friend to a very typical Nepali 'thakali set' - a fancy name for dal bhat.

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