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Beautiful December

Now, when the garden awaits the return of spring
Now, when the silence is deep and blue
Now, when the winter has cast her spell again
Beautiful December, Beautiful December

Here, where the snow is as soft as a woolly lamb
Here, where the nightfall is deep and blue,
Here, where the stars are so bright, you reach for them
Beautiful December, Beautiful December

Child, may you sleep in gentle peace tonight
Dream of songs that rise on silken wings!
When you wake, enchanted by the snowspun light
Sing the songs that came to you in dreams,
Your beautiful December dreams
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What kind of books do you like to read?

mheredgemheredge TeacherHere and therePosts: 35,067 mod
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Comments

  • bnfsnfbnfsnf Posts: 13 ✭✭
    You know, as I am a psychologist most of the time I prefer to read psychological books which acquaint me with major psychological disorders. After that I'm fond of romantic novels and historical stories. In addition I read the books which have written by my favorite writers such as Irvin Yalom, Paulo Coelho, etc.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,349 mod
    mheredge said:
    That's interesting, and I have read a lot of the books that are in the picture even from other countries, though of course I have read the English translation versions.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    I've read a few of the books shown on the map @GemmaRowlands and it's a good incentive now to track down some of the others.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,349 mod
    mheredge said:

    I've read a few of the books shown on the map @GemmaRowlands and it's a good incentive now to track down some of the others.

    Yes, it is a decent list of things to read. You could even read books when you visit each country, the famous ones that were written in that country, for added authenticity!
  • VokVok Posts: 971 ✭✭✭
    I remember watching a video from Ted talks the other day about a woman who set a goal to read one book from every country in the world in a year. I like the idea as it's quite an ambitious goal and horizon-broadening experience.
    https://www.ted.com/talks/ann_morgan_my_year_reading_a_book_from_every_country_in_the_world
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    Well I've already read Les Miserables but I'm not sure what was tagged for Italy @GemmaRowlands - if we get this far. The weather looks set to be against us for the next few days. So I'm just working through my free detective novels I have downloaded from Bookbub. And very entertaining they're proving to be too.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    @Vok this lady must have plenty of time on her hands as reading this many books, she'd have to be reading a couple of books every three or four days. Unless of course she cheats by reading short books and not too many like War and Peace!

    Kindle books usually give an idea of how long the book takes to read (I guess for a native speaker). Most novels seem to be estimated at between five and seven hours, though I haven't checked how long I'm taking to read them.
  • VokVok Posts: 971 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge I agree. Not to mention she must've spent a lot of time tracking down and procuring most of books.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    I think I will just stick to ploughing through my freebies @Vok. They'll do till I get home.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,349 mod
    Vok said:

    I remember watching a video from Ted talks the other day about a woman who set a goal to read one book from every country in the world in a year. I like the idea as it's quite an ambitious goal and horizon-broadening experience.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/ann_morgan_my_year_reading_a_book_from_every_country_in_the_world

    I think it is very ambitious, as there are a lot of countries in the world. In fact, I am almost certain that nobody has enough time to read that number of books in that space of time.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    I think it is very easy to google and find the novels written that were set in a particular country @Vok. I have often done this to read and watch movies set in places I am visiting, to try to get a feel for the place. Often this can be better than any guide book at giving a better insight into local culture.
  • josephFCBjosephFCB Posts: 19 ✭✭
    science books especially IT field , i like also to read long stories like "agatha cristiy" crime stories.
  • JMAROUFJMAROUF Posts: 100 ✭✭
    i usually read technical books in informatic
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,399 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 25
    wrong, deleted
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    For lightweight holiday reading, I like fairly easy to read crime novels. I've devoured a few in the last week, on my Kindle while I have been travelling.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,399 ✭✭✭✭
    I like historical novels on the long past times, such as ancient and early medieval history. Popular history books too. Ancient literature sometimes, especially as reading before bedtime.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,349 mod

    I like historical novels on the long past times, such as ancient and early medieval history. Popular history books too. Ancient literature sometimes, especially as reading before bedtime.

    Do you like reading historical stories that are based on truth? I do, so it's sort of part fiction part non-fiction, which is fun.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,399 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 26
    > @GemmaRowlands said:
    > Do you like reading historical stories that are based on truth? I do, so it's sort of part fiction part non-fiction, which is fun.

    Yes, I like them. An author of such books tries to tell a story which could have actually happened what is the reason why you can think it's not exactly fiction. Colleen McCullough is a good example.

    I like also the books by the members of the French 'Annales' historiographical school which focuses on the mindset of the people of the past, rather than the political events. It sheds much light on the human psyche. I'm most curious of this part of history. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annales_school

    On the other hand, so called 'alternative history' may be good, such as Harry Harrison's 'The Hammer and the Cross'.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,349 mod

    > @GemmaRowlands said:

    > Do you like reading historical stories that are based on truth? I do, so it's sort of part fiction part non-fiction, which is fun.



    Yes, I like them. An author of such books tries to tell a story which could have actually happened what is the reason why you can think it's not exactly fiction. Colleen McCullough is a good example.



    I like also the books by the members of the French 'Annales' historiographical school which focuses on the mindset of the people of the past, rather than the political events. It sheds much light on the human psyche. I'm most curious of this part of history. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annales_school



    On the other hand, so called 'alternative history' may be good, such as Harry Harrison's 'The Hammer and the Cross'.

    I have never actually heard of any of the authors that you have mentioned there, however I will be sure to check some of them out now, as I really enjoy that particular genre.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    @Practical_Severard I have heard of Coleen McCullough but don't think that I've ever read anything by this author.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,399 ✭✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > @Practical_Severard I have heard of Coleen McCullough but don't think that I've ever read anything by this author.

    With historical novels it's important what period it's about. She wrote about Rome and I like that theme. But I think that her most known novel isn't historical, it's the autobiographic 'The thorn birds'.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,399 ✭✭✭✭
    > @GemmaRowlands said:

    > I have never actually heard of any of the authors that you have mentioned there, however I will be sure to check some of them out now, as I really enjoy that particular genre.

    You could try Jacques le Goff's 'Medieval civilization 400-1500' of the Annales school. I liked it. I've read also a Russian translation of 'La Civilisation de l'Europe classique' by Pierre Chaunu, and it's good, but I'm not sure there is an English translation.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,349 mod

    > @GemmaRowlands said:



    > I have never actually heard of any of the authors that you have mentioned there, however I will be sure to check some of them out now, as I really enjoy that particular genre.



    You could try Jacques le Goff's 'Medieval civilization 400-1500' of the Annales school. I liked it. I've read also a Russian translation of 'La Civilisation de l'Europe classique' by Pierre Chaunu, and it's good, but I'm not sure there is an English translation.

    Thanks for the recommendation, I will certainly have a look. I have such an exciting "to read" list at the moment, because so many people give me interesting books to read!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    I'm wondering whether if electricity is going to be a problem, whether I need to take a paper book rather than my Kindle when I go trekking.
  • walterwalter Posts: 527 ✭✭✭
    I like to read books which are written in true event. Also some books which written by great historical figures. That book know to be a very teach.
  • viciumartisviciumartis Posts: 63 ✭✭
    to be honest i never liked idea of novels and some romans, romance and other forms of books that are not pushing you to grow..or i think so..maybe i am wrong, but in general i like psychology books, selfhelp by legit professionals and this is my call it fetish..
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,349 mod

    to be honest i never liked idea of novels and some romans, romance and other forms of books that are not pushing you to grow..or i think so..maybe i am wrong, but in general i like psychology books, selfhelp by legit professionals and this is my call it fetish..

    I also like psychology books. I have a degree in psychology, so it is very interesting to read things like that, and I understand the concepts deeply.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    I'm thinking of taking a paper book after hearing that electricity for recharging things might be problematic. The advantage of a Kindle however, is if the light is poor, I will be able to still read easily. I'm dithering.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,399 ✭✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > I'm thinking of taking a paper book after hearing that electricity for recharging things might be problematic. The advantage of a Kindle however, is if the light is poor, I will be able to still read easily. I'm dithering.

    I'm wondering why you want to take a book with you for trekking at all, I used to think that any extra weight is no-no when you're going to live a couple of weeks on what is in your backpack.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 35,067 mod
    My friend has packed some playing cards, but since we'll probably stop trekking by around 4pm, and it's dark by 6pm, this or reading is about all we'll have to do till dinner and bedtime @Practical_Severard.
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