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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February

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Unusual food

mheredgemheredge TeacherHere and therePosts: 36,162 mod
Are there any unusual foods that you eat?

Are there any unusual traditional or local dishes that you can share with us?

The Scots like haggis, the French eat snails and frogs, but I had never come across this one before. Sofkee is a Native American sour corn mixture that can come as a cool drink or warm porridge.



https://atlasobscura.com/foods/sofkee-sofkey-sour-corn?utm_source=Atlas+Obscura+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=dec3540e22-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_07_09&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f36db9c480-dec3540e22-65904101&ct=t(EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_7_9_2018)&mc_cid=dec3540e22&mc_eid=5918298398

Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,729 mod
    mheredge said:

    Are there any unusual foods that you eat?

    Are there any unusual traditional or local dishes that you can share with us?

    The Scots like haggis, the French eat snails and frogs, but I had never come across this one before. Sofkee is a Native American sour corn mixture that can come as a cool drink or warm porridge.



    https://atlasobscura.com/foods/sofkee-sofkey-sour-corn?utm_source=Atlas+Obscura+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=dec3540e22-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_07_09&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f36db9c480-dec3540e22-65904101&ct=t(EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_7_9_2018)&mc_cid=dec3540e22&mc_eid=5918298398

    I don't really eat strange foods, as I can be quite picky and I don't like anything unusual. But I don't even know how people can eat haggis. Just the thought of it is disgusting to me.
  • javierjavier Posts: 287 Inactive
      @mheredge in Spain there are also many people who eat snails and frogs even in my family but I am particularly disgusted
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I like haggis, frogs and snails!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,492 ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 2018
    Here we eat buckwheat porridge often enough as a side dish to meat or fish. Some people outside Russia also eat the grean parts of the plant, but we never do it. This is a photo:
    https://natashaskitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/How-to-Cook-Buckwheat-Kasha-7-480x270.jpg

    The drink named 'kvass' made from fermented rye bread is another example. It's good in the hot season and the cold soup 'okroshka' (ock-rOsh-kah) is made with it.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass

    Mushrooms are eaten here more often than in the Western Europe, I guess. They maybe fried or become the main ingridient in a soup, seasoned or salted for use as an appetiser. Many people enjoy mushroom picking, in fact some find it quite addictive.

    Slippery jacks fried in smetana (a version if the sour cream) with potatoes:
    https://img.povar.ru/uploads/5b/e3/2e/dd/maslyata_jarenie_v_smetane-124614.jpg

    The aspic is also quite popular. it's usually piquant, with horse radish in this case:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspic#/media/File:Holodez_s_hrenom.JPG
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,729 mod
    javier said:

      @mheredge in Spain there are also many people who eat snails and frogs even in my family but I am particularly disgusted

    I think it just depends on what you're used to, because I know I wouldn't able to eat anything like that myself, but to other people it's just normal.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    The slippery jack's looks very nice @Practical_Severard . I only eat buckwheat flour bread in Nepal and it is good.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,492 ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 2018
    > @mheredge said:
    > The slippery jack's looks very nice @Practical_Severard . I only eat buckwheat flour bread in Nepal and it is good.
    As for the mushrooms, many people pick them by themselves while they're rarely found in groceries. Yes, one can by them in markets or even from private vendors elsewhere, such as country road sides but I wouldn't really advise it.

    We have buckwheat flour products here too, though it's something imported one comes across in a healthy food boutique. Unlike them, buckwheat porridge is a real staple side dish cooked everywhere, starting from homes and ending with canteens of all sorts. It's considered tastier then any other porridge and it is a part of different medical diets. This dish isn't prestigious, so a posh restaurant wouldn't usually offer it as a side dish, they'll rather stuff a suckling piglet with it. (and with mushrooms!)
    (a stuffing stage photo: https://www.edimdoma.ru/data/recipe_steps/0006/9055/69055-ed4_thumb.jpg?1492151281 , a served dish https://gde.ru/images/img_ru/474x354/82/cb/82cbf6daacef0ad763ffb61e9b1e8c33.jpg )

    Or maybe cooked in a traditional Russian stove, if the have one, so in the both cases the restaurant would specialise on the Russian cuisine.
    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
  • VokVok Posts: 1,027 ✭✭✭
    I'm not much of a foodie and what I've tried unusual were frogs and snails. Generally I liked the experience, though eating frogs wasn't far different from eating chicken. I'd like to try haggis without thinking too much about the ingredients.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,729 mod
    Vok said:

    I'm not much of a foodie and what I've tried unusual were frogs and snails. Generally I liked the experience, though eating frogs wasn't far different from eating chicken. I'd like to try haggis without thinking too much about the ingredients.

    I know a lot of people who say that frogs are like chicken, but I just don't fancy the taste of it myself if I'm being honest.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    It's a bit like the really tender chicken meat close to the bone @GemmaRowlands.

    Today I had some very good squid in its ink. I'm in food heaven down here in Séville.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,416 mod
    This year we can harvesting plenty of apples. Our orchard is full of this kind. Last week we took crates of apples to a local apple press and which we can collect apple juice (bottled in pastic bag to 5 litres) next week. The only disadvandages of this possibility is we don't get our own apples.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    Have you thought of making cider with your apples @Hermine? My gransfather had several apple trees and used to make cider. He used to use the village apple press and I guess got back the juice that was not necessarily from his own trees.

    My Nepalese turmeric seems to be doing very well out in the garden. Apparently when the leaves go brown, this is the time to uproot it and collect the turmeric roots. Then I can start the process again by taking a bit of the root and leaving it to sprout for the following year.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,729 mod
    Hermine said:

    This year we can harvesting plenty of apples. Our orchard is full of this kind. Last week we took crates of apples to a local apple press and which we can collect apple juice (bottled in pastic bag to 5 litres) next week. The only disadvandages of this possibility is we don't get our own apples.

    I would love to have apples of my own growing in my garden. I suppose I could try and grow them, but the trees would take a long time to grow.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,416 mod
    @GemmaRowlands, our apple trees are more than 50 years old. And, I saw plent of young trees that already carry lots of fruit. It's never too late, better now than never!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I think you can buy young trees from a nursery @GemmaRowlands that should produce fruit fairly quickly. I used to have a cherry tree in my garden in London. The apple tree never seemed to produce any fruit though.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 8,729 mod
    mheredge said:

    I think you can buy young trees from a nursery @GemmaRowlands that should produce fruit fairly quickly. I used to have a cherry tree in my garden in London. The apple tree never seemed to produce any fruit though.

    I know of a few people who have bought fruit trees only to find that they don't give any fruit. I would be disappointed if that happened to me.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 36,162 mod
    I think often it's to do with male and female trees and cross pollination @GemmaRowlands. I suppose the best way is to get two trees after consulting an expert.
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