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AM/PM Session - 10 July 2018 - The effects of telecommuting

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 963 Teacher
We read an article about the effects for individuals and companies when employees telecommute:

http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20180130-what-if-you-never-saw-your-colleagues-in-person-again

Vocabulary Top 10:

devoid - not having (something usual or expected) : completely without (something)

telecommute - to work at home by using a computer connection to a company's main office

self imposed - required by you of yourself : not given to you by someone else

isolation - the state of being in a place or situation that is separate from others : the condition of being isolated

doppelganger - someone who looks like someone else

amusement - something (such as an activity) that amuses or entertains someone

droves - a large group of people or animals that move or act together

ennui - a lack of spirit, enthusiasm, or interest; boredom

upset - angry or unhappy

keep tabs on - to carefully watch (someone or something) in order to learn what that person or thing is doing


Would you like to work from home instead of in the office?
Do you think there are more benefits or negatives to this working arrangement?

Comments

  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,549 mod
    edited July 2018
    Unfortunatey or fortunately, a job as a nurse is (almost) impossible to do out of office.
    I said "almost" because the teamof the Flying Doctors sometimes has to give patients the instruction from distance by phone.
    But that's mostly only for a temporary solution.
    Doctors or nurses still have to examine patients physically.

    "Unfortunately" because working from home has also some benefits, especially nowadays with the daily traffic jam ... you could gain money and time.
    "Fortunately" because I don't think I could work from home everyday from nine to five, five days a week.
    I like to be at home, but that is different; because I could ask friends to visit me, or do some activities at home whenever I will.
    I don't think that my boss will appreciate me if I make some amusements during working hours.
    Especially if they give me that "ID badges that track biometric data from human employees" ... Thank you but no thanks.
    That's worse than the ankle bracelet that defendants under house arrest or parole have to wear.
    Post edited by april on
  • MonikMonik Posts: 1,004 ✭✭✭✭
    @NatashaT In regard of telecommuting, I've had the experience doing this sort of job. To me it was an excellent experience. Nevertheless, the article points out very interesting facts, which in the long run are true. This sort of job has pros and cons, for instance being at home without thinking of getting ready to go to work or skipping traffic, that is brilliant! On the other hand, relationships at work are different. It's hard to bond with someone because there's no time to know each other well. In fact the contact you have with your colleagues is limited and conversations are based on work. Then, for the same reason it's hard to engaged to the company, or follow the company's culture.

    I would say that telecommuting would be a very good option depending on what type of person you are so your interests. From my experience it was perfect because it was a part time job, so that I had much more things to do during the day. I was still in contact with real world. BUT, it would scare me out the idea of working too many hours in my computer without having contact with anyone. Sadly nowadays these type of jobs are becoming more common, therefore it jeopardizes our social skills even more.

    Ultimately, telecommuting is just another piece of our future-world puzzle. :neutral:
  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 1,849 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think that working from home can have some benefits: you avoid having to rush outdoor in the traffic, anxiously trying to report at the workplace in time.

    You save the cost of transport and the correlated stress to meet the required punctuality.

    By this allowed perk, you also enjoy the possibility to work in a familiar place ( I can't think of any more so than your own house, right ? ).

    You can work at the monitor, but at the same time keeping an eye or even half an eye on your children, for instance.

    You can stop for a while, and not just once, over and over again, without having to fear the presence of your boss frowning upon you at your back, neither the reproachful mumbling of your diligent compliant colleague next desk.

    That's not their business after all, you think. You are a loyal worker and every time you resume your task at the exact point where you previously stopped.

    The only things at play here are your honesty and accountability, which you're too sure won't fail at all, under any adverse circumstances.

    You just need to lighten a bit your work pressure, so be welcome if your boss gives rope to their leash and allow you to telecommute.

    Only, we need to make sure companies don't give someone enough rope to hang themselves.

    There is a latin saying ' divide et impera ', meaning divide and rule.

    Ancient Roman rulers thought that, in order to maintain control over their subjects, the masses, they should encourage arguments and quarrels among people so as to avoid being spotted as the authentic target of general outcry.

    But the idea of ' divide et impera ', might also be enforced by workers' separation and isolation.

    The only way, for workers, to get their rights acknowledged by the employer, has always been to gather together and make pressure by claiming better conditions for all.

    This strategy, however, has never worked out well, whenever the worker was protesting alone.

    Colleagues can be a bore or even annoying, but, all the same, when it comes to straighten out some conditions in the workplace, you had better make sure you all fight with a unity of intent.

    Who knows, your company might decide that, since you work from home, they can reduce your days of holiday.

    By eliminating the psycho-physical stress connected to the daily commute, they can save some days of leave formerly assigned to workers in office.

    Therefore, while enjoying your staying apart, from time to time, you even shouldn't mind assembling with all your co-workers, to hear what's going on, just in case.

    If anything, it will be an occasion to clear the cobwebs of pretended self-sufficiency away.
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
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