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There is wind where the rose was,
Cold rain where sweet grass was,
And clouds like sheep
Stream o'er the steep
Grey skies where the lark was.

Nought warm where your hand was,
Nought gold where your hair was,
But phantom, forlorn,
Beneath the thorn,
Your ghost where your face was.

Cold wind where your voice was,
Tears, tears where my heart was,
And ever with me,
Child, ever with me,
Silence where hope was.

November by Walter de la Mare
August
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If you were to choose another country, where would you like to live?

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Comments

  • Shishio13Shishio13 Posts: 154 ✭✭✭
    @walter It's Colombia not Columbia. Many people dispelling my country's name, Columbia is a state or a uni in USA :P.
    I think if you are going to be an expat it depends on what is the reason to live abroad. If you are a worker or student in a foreign country is more difficult to embrace the local culture that somebody engaged or living with a native
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    What I like is how I meet not only people from all over the world who like it here, but French people who have worked abroad and have come back to settle here @GemmaRowlands.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    Shishio13 said:

    @walter It's Colombia not Columbia. Many people dispelling my country's name, Columbia is a state or a uni in USA :P.

    I think if you are going to be an expat it depends on what is the reason to live abroad. If you are a worker or student in a foreign country is more difficult to embrace the local culture that somebody engaged or living with a native

    I also thought that you meant Columbia, so it is interesting to hear that you didn't (and also that someone else thought the same as me!)
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    Do you mean here?


  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭✭
    Although I'v never set food on France would I like to live there. I love their language and might like their food, but without frog legs, that for sure and snails as well.

    I'd have plenty of money, would be young and beautiful or just pretty. I would live in a nice, quiet flat directly in the city. I would have a great job and earn good money. I'd have a few really good friends and some party friends. My figure would be just great for wearing expensive clothes.
    I could eat whatever I want without gaining weight.
    I would speak perfect French, German and English.

    The roots to my home country are still alive and I would visit my Tyrol regularly.

    I would count Marianne to one of my best friends and we would visit us eath other as often as possible.

    That's me.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    Ah @Hermine! If only it were possible to eat whatever I wanted without putting on weight!! I think this would be wonderful. It sounds like you should come to Nice but be warned, the food is so good.....
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    Hermine said:

    Although I'v never set food on France would I like to live there. I love their language and might like their food, but without frog legs, that for sure and snails as well.

    I'd have plenty of money, would be young and beautiful or just pretty. I would live in a nice, quiet flat directly in the city. I would have a great job and earn good money. I'd have a few really good friends and some party friends. My figure would be just great for wearing expensive clothes.
    I could eat whatever I want without gaining weight.
    I would speak perfect French, German and English.

    The roots to my home country are still alive and I would visit my Tyrol regularly.

    I would count Marianne to one of my best friends and we would visit us eath other as often as possible.

    That's me.

    I have heard that frogs' legs are quite nice! I have not tried them myself, because I am a bit nervous of what they might look like. The rest of the food in France sounds nice, though!
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge, is it true that French people like eating small portions from a large range?

    Germans like great portions. They like it when meats hang over the plates.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    The French love their food @Hermine and probably they eat smaller portion sizes, but more courses. That way you can taste more things! Tonight I am serving my Austrian friend an entree of a scallop pate (I cheated, as I didn't make it myself), with some smoked salmon and prawns and aioli (garlic mayonnaise), with some beetroot and goat cheese balsamic vinegar salad; then some roast chicken with sweet potato mash, gravy and some coloured tomato and lettuce salad. This then is followed by an assortment of cheese and for desert I have some kiwi and homemade kiwi ice cream. For so many courses, the portions can't be too big, though my friend is always very satisfying to feed as he has a very healthy appetite.
  • Shishio13Shishio13 Posts: 154 ✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands @Hermine When I was in Singapore one friend of mine invited to me to have dinner. The main dish were frog's legs. It tastes and feel like eat chicken.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    The food in Singapore is so tasty @Shishio13. I had some very nice frogs in Vietnam, though here they were whole! They were quite big and plump though, in a delicious soup.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭✭
    Might be it was a toad, Marianne. As far as I know they are bigger and more plump compaired to frogs.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭✭
    It sound delicious the offer on dishes you made for your Austrian friend.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    @Hermine I think it was probably something like this, cooked in the 'adobo' way where the whole frog is cooked and not just the legs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_edible_frog


  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭✭
    I admire the French for their language, couture houses (fashion) Nice, Paris, history incl. Napoleon, but surely not for eating frog legs and snails. I can't even eat our rabbits, to which we've a close friendship.
  • walterwalter Posts: 683 ✭✭✭
    I can not eat frog. Just when I think to eat frog I get feeling of disgusting.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,579 ✭✭✭✭
    @walter I've eaten frog legs and snails once in Paris. A frog tastes like chicken. You should just enjoy the taste and not think of the origin of the meat.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    I doubt that you would like foie gras either @Hermine. A lot of people think it is cruel how the ducks are force-fed, though I have my doubts if the ones I saw were anything to go by. And if the duck feels stressed, apparently this effects the liver. So the farmers make sure that they are kept in very good conditions.

    I think many vegetarians don't eat meat because they don't like the idea of eating cute animals, or any animal for that matter @walter. That said, vegetarianism is a relatively new thing in France and most French people i know like their meat.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭✭
    A time ago I saw a documentary about keeping goose. The goose were fed by force. A man held a tube into the poor animals mouth and filled it up.

    ------

    I love to tell another story. Also shown on telly, a pig farmer showed his pigs. He told us the animals are alound to stay togehter until day X.
    They get born and grow up from toddlers group onwards to kindergarden, school ,to a-level he sayed. There is no fear that the animals bite their tailes each other off. They aren't stressed by transporting from one place to another and always mingeld with other foreign pigs.

    I could tell another similar story about a sheep farmer.

    Thiese are ways animals should be kept, decent and species-appropriate.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    Hermine said:

    @mheredge, is it true that French people like eating small portions from a large range?

    Germans like great portions. They like it when meats hang over the plates.

    I have found that to be true in Spain, to, and it was difficult to get used to at first as I still tried to eat large amounts of one food!
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    Spain is famous for its huge range of tapas dishes @GemmaRowlands. But many restaurants also specialise in one particular type of dish and then they serve it up on a large plate, which typically people share. I remember a Spanish friend taking me round the bars and restaurants in Madrid where every place we went to had its own particular food.
  • walterwalter Posts: 683 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge I agree with you that main reason why vegetarian don`t eat meat is that they think about torture that animal pass. Second reason is that because eating crops is healthier than eating meat.
  • JanjardJanjard Posts: 1,971 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 19
    In the past, as a little boy of 7 years old, I read an exciting book that was intended for older children from about 12 years old. That age may be true, because I got the book from my brother who is seven years older.

    It was exciting; I ended up in a different world in a different time. But it was a realistic and impressive book. I could empathize with what was described and could smell the odors that were described: for example, the smell of tar pots in the harbor. I could feel the atmosphere of the port city, even though I was 7 years old.
    The book was set in New Zealand and a huge whale played a role that could be evoked by a tone from a Maori tribe.
    The book impressed me even more because I didn't understand half of it and filled it with my own clear imagination. When, as an adult, I found the book that was lost and read it again, it was unfortunately no longer as exciting and fun as in my memory.

    Much later, as adult, I read a travel description about New Zealand. The writer called it the last paradise on earth. After that I occasionally had vague plans to emigrate. It has not become something real. But after that time I would once go to NEW ZEALAND.


    Unfortunately, paradisiacal New Zealand was rocked last week by a terrible attack.
    Has paradise been lost now?
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 23,568 mod
    I love to travel to different countries and places, and I discover a lot of things but if I come home then I think about the words: " East or west, home is best."
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    mheredge said:

    Spain is famous for its huge range of tapas dishes @GemmaRowlands. But many restaurants also specialise in one particular type of dish and then they serve it up on a large plate, which typically people share. I remember a Spanish friend taking me round the bars and restaurants in Madrid where every place we went to had its own particular food.

    Yes I was somewhere where they served a lovely paella once and that was on a massive dish and we all shared from it.
  • ech0panditech0pandit Posts: 341 ✭✭✭
    I'd love to live all of my life in India only, now there maybe deserts or sweet things of other countries which I'd prefer but the spice and chilli oooooh I can't just leave it, and from what I have heard people say most countries use less spices .
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    You might like Thailand @ech0pandit. They use a lot of spice there. But you are right, not many countries use as much spice as India. A lot use them though, so if you want to travel to places where they have spicy food, there are still quite a lot of places you can go to: Singapore, Malaysia, Cambodia, Vietnam, Mexico, and even the UK if you search for the right places!

    Chatting with a group of friends this morning, we played a game where everyone had to pick one thing they liked best about Nice. The list was endless: the weather (sun), the sea, the transport, the vibe, the 'walkability' or ease of walking everywhere, the food, the proximity to mountains (even snow and skiing in the winter), the cosmopolitan mix of people from all over the world, the activities that go on here - film, music, book festivals, carnival, public lectures, sports - marathons, Grand Prix nearby, sailing.... None of us could really find much to complain about.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod

    I'd love to live all of my life in India only, now there maybe deserts or sweet things of other countries which I'd prefer but the spice and chilli oooooh I can't just leave it, and from what I have heard people say most countries use less spices .

    I think it is a very good idea to base your choice of country on the food that you like the most, as this means you are likely to enjoy your life there!
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,740 ✭✭✭✭
    May this is why British people enjoy to travel @ech0pandit! The food isn't so wonderful there as it is in India!!
  • ech0panditech0pandit Posts: 341 ✭✭✭
    hahaha @mheredge very true and there is one more thing we have a ton of festivals which are celebrated in different ways,like tomorrow is Holi and we will play with colors and eat sweets.
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