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In the merry month of May
When green leaves begin to spring,
Little lambs do skip like fairies,
Birds do couple, build, and sing.
A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
May
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London

mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
Has anyone been to London?

If so, did you go as a tourist or on business? I have you lived there for any amount of time?

I used to live and work there commuting on the Tube or buses most of the time, but as a child, living not far from London I used to visit as a tourist.

This article is about six places that are suggested as top sights to see. I have never visited one and never been inside another (can you guess which ones?) Have you been to any of these places?

https://theculturetrip.com/europe/united-kingdom/england/london/articles/6-london-attractions-you-should-visit-at-least-once/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190420global&utm_slot=4




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Comments

  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,843 mod
    First, I want to thank Marianne for her efforts taking always so interesting themes to the table. Thank You.

    Second, I was in London for several times. I took each of my children at the age of eleven or twelve to London and visited the most well-known tourist attractions. Last time my youngest girl and I were at HarryPotter's.

    Each time it was an overwhelming adventure for us.

    I wish I could be there more often, but I'm also happy to come back home, because cities are dirty and noisy and very exhausting for a cottage person like me.


    @Marianne, I guess you never have been at Churchill's bunker? Or was it the film studio?
    It's really difficult to guess.

    As for me, when there next time I 'll visit Churchill's underground office.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    Churchill's bunker is very interesting @Hermine and well worth a visit. I had wanted to go for a long time and not long ago when I was arranging to catch-up with a schoolfriend and her husband who's just retired, we decided we'd go.

    So yes, I have been to the bunker, but never to the Harry Potter film set. I used to think Leadenhall Market in the City was in a way similar (without the wizardry of course) as the passageways remind me of where Potter bought his wand. This is a good place for lunch if you are in the area, and is not very far from St Pauls.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,843 mod
    I'll keep in mind. Thanks for the tip. I wish I were there.

    The big room, where all the big events took place in the Harry Potter films, are amazing, the figures of chess and the bedrooms reminds in my head.



  • VokVok Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭
    No, I haven't been to London or the UK. I've never even been to any English speaking country. I'd reciprocate with a question this time. London is obviuosly a melting pot. What city in the UK should I visit to see the 'real' England?
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,843 mod
    I'll pass your question over @Vok to a proper English person here.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,200 ✭✭✭
    Thanks for passing it on @Hermine .
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    @Vok there are many other cities in Britain that are much more what you could call 'real' England. I always like to visit York, which is surrounded by some of the best countryside as well as having a beautiful cathedral and lovely historic centre. It is true that you need to get away from London to really understand better what Britain is really about. That said, I like London very much for its diversity and open-mindedness.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,329 mod
    I've been to London lots of times, both as a tourist and working. My brass band have played concerts in London. I love the city, but it's too busy for me to live in.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    It is a fairly hectic place @GemmaRowlands. I must say I find it quite hard to believe I lived there for several years. I much more enjoy the relative calm of a small city.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,329 mod
    mheredge said:

    It is a fairly hectic place @GemmaRowlands. I must say I find it quite hard to believe I lived there for several years. I much more enjoy the relative calm of a small city.

    I think there are some parts that are quieter, but as much as I love visiting central London for the shops, I couldn't live there in the long term.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    I lived in a very central part of London which was amazingly quiet @GemmaRowlands. Spitting distance from King's Cross, my house was shielded by taller buildings so I heard very little traffic noise even though I was only about 3 minutes from the Euston Road.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,638 ✭✭✭✭
    edited April 26
    I spent a week in London in 2005 with my family, the one between the two bombings in the Tube. We spent most of the time in museums and our hotel was one street away from the Paddington Station. So we never left the city centre. The Science Museum provides an insight how majestic and overwhelming was the British industrialisation era. I remember the Sumerian goat of the British Museum very well too, but I have to own up to that I have forgotten all the paintings I saw in the National and the National Portrait galleries. And there are some small animals in the Kensington gardens, even roe deers! Seeing them in the heart of a megapolis is quite stunning. The London Aquarium is well worth visiting too.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    I never knew that there were deer in Kensington Gardens @Practical_Severard though even when I lived in London (1994-2005), I did not go to the parks all that often. I did used to visit the British Museum fairly often as it was on my doorstep and was open on a Sunday, so if I had nothing to do, I used to go and visit one or two of the rooms there. My favourite was the Central Asian department with the beautiful tiles from places like Samarkand.

    I have been to the National Galley tons of times and like you, can't say I remember any of the paintings in particular. When I was a child, the Natural History and Science Museums were both my favourite. I visited the Victoria & Albert Museum a few time usually on school visits, but did not find it so exciting as this museum hold more textiles and furniture. I think this was just because I was a bit too young to appreciate it as now this is the kind of museum I like best.

    I was in India at the time of the bombings in July 2005. Three of the five that all went off on the same day were too close for comfort to my home (those in Tavistock Place, Russell Square and King's Cross). I did not realise that there were any bombings a week before or after.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,329 mod

    I spent a week in London in 2005 with my family, the one between the two bombings in the Tube. We spent most of the time in museums and our hotel was one street away from the Paddington Station. So we never left the city centre. The Science Museum provides an insight how majestic and overwhelming was the British industrialisation era. I remember the Sumerian goat of the British Museum very well too, but I have to own up to that I have forgotten all the paintings I saw in the National and the National Portrait galleries. And there are some small animals in the Kensington gardens, even roe deers! Seeing them in the heart of a megapolis is quite stunning. The London Aquarium is well worth visiting too.

    The bombings were a very worrying time, weren't they. It seems as though everyone knew someone in London, so they were all worried and wanted to make sure that they were okay.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    I was shocked when I happened to be in the UK during the ten year anniversary of the event and same documentaries about the day. I never realised how bad it had been.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,638 ✭✭✭✭


    The bombings were a very worrying time, weren't they. It seems as though everyone knew someone in London, so they were all worried and wanted to make sure that they were okay.

    I can understand that. We have also had several terror attacks here. Besides, as far as I remember, the London bombists were on the loose after the first series of attacks. We didn't use the London metro because of that. I thought a bus was a less favourable target than a crowded Tube station.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    Of the five attacks on that day, four were in Tube trains or station, with one being on a bus that was in Tavistock Place when it went off @Practical_Severard. This is just a few minutes away from where I used to live. It must have been a scary time to be in London.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,329 mod


    The bombings were a very worrying time, weren't they. It seems as though everyone knew someone in London, so they were all worried and wanted to make sure that they were okay.

    I can understand that. We have also had several terror attacks here. Besides, as far as I remember, the London bombists were on the loose after the first series of attacks. We didn't use the London metro because of that. I thought a bus was a less favourable target than a crowded Tube station.

    Yes definitely, I think it's a bit scary travelling underground, even without terrorism or the risk of it.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,638 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 7

    Yes definitely, I think it's a bit scary travelling underground, even without terrorism or the risk of it.

    I think any big city, be it London, Beijing or Moscow, couldn't be functioning without a metro system, so the dwellers have to cope with it... They say that more than 1.8 mln people spend more than a hour underground in Moscow. I believe the same applies to London.

    Today we have here walk-through metal detectors on every metro station as well as guards who pat some people and we have always had the police patrolling the platforms, but I'm not sure it's something more than a "security theatre". With more than 9 mln rides a day a quality inspection is hardly possible.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,843 mod
    it sounds relly scary what you all have to tell us.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,843 mod
    The other day I read that teachers in Floridas schools should be allowed to wear guns.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    Not just in Florida @Hermine, I think there are lots of places in the USA that have been arming teachers so they can fight back if gunmen try to attack students. I think it is appalling as this sets a terrible example to the children. Better would be a ban on firearms for everyone.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard I have noticed in many countries that there are security machines on entry to the metro system. In Delhi I have seen it, yet there I am not even aware gun crime is a big problem. I can't imagine it is practical in any metro system that is as busy as London or other big cities.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,329 mod

    Yes definitely, I think it's a bit scary travelling underground, even without terrorism or the risk of it.

    I think any big city, be it London, Beijing or Moscow, couldn't be functioning without a metro system, so the dwellers have to cope with it... They say that more than 1.8 mln people spend more than a hour underground in Moscow. I believe the same applies to London.

    Today we have here walk-through metal detectors on every metro station as well as guards who pat some people and we have always had the police patrolling the platforms, but I'm not sure it's something more than a "security theatre". With more than 9 mln rides a day a quality inspection is hardly possible.
    Yes that's definitely true. But security is certainly getting better, it's a shame that such terrible events had to happen before security was taken really seriously, though.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 9
    They may not have security machines for luggage in the London Underground, but they certainly have a lot of cameras. There must be at least 12,000 cameras (the article is a few years old).

    Big brother is watching, even if it is for our protection! https://learnenglish.vanillacommunity.com/discussion/6452/big-brother-is-watching

    https://www.ifsecglobal.com/video-surveillance/security-on-the-london-underground/


  • bfluentmanishbfluentmanish Posts: 143 ✭✭
    I have a dream in my life to visit London that's why i am writing this small summary about London.
    London is considered one of most important global cities on the planet.
    It has been termed the world's most powerful, most desirable, most influential, most visited, most expensive, innovative, sustainable, most investment friendly, most popular for work, and the most vegetarian friendly city in the world.
    London exerts a considerable impact upon the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transportation.
    London has a diverse range of people and cultures, and more than 300 languages are spoken in the region.
    London's vast urban area is often described using a set of district names, such as Bloomsbury, Mayfair, Wembley and Whitechapel.

    London's buildings are too diverse to be characterized by any particular architectural style, partly because of their varying ages.
    Since London is very beautiful city hence there are lot of places for visiting.
    Houses of Parliament, the iconic ‘Big Ben’ clock tower and Westminster Abbey, site of British monarch coronations. Across the Thames River, the London Eye observation wheel provides panoramic views of the South Bank cultural complex, and the entire city.
  • Shishio13Shishio13 Posts: 145 ✭✭
    I'm a great tennis fan and one of my biggest dreams is someday to attend Wimbledon Championship. I would be such a happy person. It would be more special if I attend one Federer match before he retires
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 38,185 ✭✭✭✭
    I have never gone to Wimbledon but I did once see McEnroe play at Wembley @Shishio13.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 1,638 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 11
    mheredge said:

    @Practical_Severard I have noticed in many countries that there are security machines on entry to the metro system. In Delhi I have seen it, yet there I am not even aware gun crime is a big problem. I can't imagine it is practical in any metro system that is as busy as London or other big cities.

    That's what they call "the security theatre" because those measures don't really improve a place's security. The main threat is bomb attacks, especially by suicide bombers, and metal detectors can't detect explosives.
    Terrorists used to attack government officials or political opponents, maybe police officers or army personnel, but certain persons in all cases, but our age has brought to life the attacks against general public what is an outcome of the deficiencies of the modern psyche.
    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
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