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Earthquakes

mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,165 ✭✭✭✭
edited July 2019 in Science and nature
Have you ever experienced an earthquake? Do you live in a seismic area?

Did you know that the more little quakes the better, as this can relieve the pressure that builds up for a big one?

Did you know that the measurement of earthquakes on the Richter scales increases exponentially?

Did you know that there are hundreds of quakes occurring every day? And some are quite strong too.

This story is all the more worrying as the earthquake described here shows how humans are interfering with nature and can cause earthquakes.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190708-the-mystery-of-unexplained-earthquakes

I never saw this video before. I know this place very well. It was filmed in Nepal during the 7.2 earthquake in May 2015. (I was not there at the time).

Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    I am obviously in the UK, where there is very little seismic activity, however I have experienced one small quake when I was younger. It was very mild, but I still found it scary, so I certainly wouldn't like to be in a country where they were more severe.
  • Shishio13Shishio13 Posts: 172 ✭✭✭
    Here often we have little earthquakes because Colombia is in a sismic area. One of the worst feeling is when you are in high building and you feel and see everything shaking and even others buildings bend a little bit with the movement. It's really scary.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,165 ✭✭✭✭
    I recall there was a big earthquake off the coast of Ecuador when I was in Colombia @Shishio13, a few years ago. It didn't affect Quito, so I was able to visit for ten days. I never really gave it much thought that Colombia must be sitting on the same fault line which I suppose is the same one that goes up along California.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    Shishio13 said:

    Here often we have little earthquakes because Colombia is in a sismic area. One of the worst feeling is when you are in high building and you feel and see everything shaking and even others buildings bend a little bit with the movement. It's really scary.

    I think I would be scared, although I know that a lot of modern buildings are built to withstand earthquakes, so I suppose many places that experience them are still safe.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,449 mod
    I am lucky, I have only ever experienced small earth tremors.

    @Shishio13 *seismic
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,165 ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 2019
    The strongest I ever experienced was 6.9 in Kathmandu once but it was the fact it lasted so long @Teach - about 50 seconds was what was scary. It did not do much damage anywhere, except the British Embassy's wall collapsed and unfortunately caused the only casualties in the city.

    That says it all really. It was a wall that had been declared unsafe but the embassy had been too stingy to get it fixed. I am sure the compensation that they very quickly had to cough up with was far more than the cost of a new wall.
  • Abdul_WahidAbdul_Wahid Posts: 6
    i experienced the earth quick in pakistan with the rate of 6.6 on rector scale. thank allah it saved me and our family
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,165 ✭✭✭✭
    @Abdul_Wahid when was this? I once experienced an earthquake in Nepal. It was very scary. Fortunately it was very deep and did not do much damage, even though it was felt as far away as Delhi and Dhaka. Luckily I wasn't in Nepal during the big one four years ago.
  • diako87diako87 Posts: 31 ✭✭
    I'm a Civil Engineering Student and have been doing my thesis on the impact of the earthquake on infrastructures. I'm from Iran, and most parts of my country are at risk of the earthquake. I've just experienced an earthquake once, which its intensity was very low. As mentioned above, the more little quakes are better, as this can relieve the pressure that builds up for a big one, but in Tehran( capital of Iran), we've not had a powerful earthquake in about 200 years. This could be very dangerous for the city, and it may be probable to occur a terrible earthquake in the future. Also, the building and infrastructure in Tehran are not of acceptable quality.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,165 ✭✭✭✭
    @diako87 I was reading an interesting article about how with much less human movement going on due to the virus, that smaller quakes are possible to detect. I have experienced a few small quakes in Nepal (not the big one in 2015) and one time was quite scared by one that had the floor moving under my feet for nearly a minute. (I used to live in Kathmandu). Here in the Cote d'Azur, we feel them fairly frequently, but tiny tremors that are less than a 3 on the Richter scale. I think the fault is under the Ligurian Sea.

    Nepal is supposed to be still waiting for The Big One as the 7.2 in 2015 was still not as big as it could have been given the pressure under the Himalayas. Unfortunately when it happens, I don't think Nepal will be much better prepared than they were in 2015.
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