Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

By all these lovely tokens
September days are here,
With summer’s best of weather
And autumn’s best of cheer.

Helen Hunt Jackson - September
The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

John Updike, September
Learn English in September

Lazy British children!

mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,788 ✭✭✭✭
It appears British children are reckoned to be the laziest in the world. Adults too. Last week it was reported that 6 million middle-aged adults in England take less than 10 minutes’ brisk exercise a month, risking their health.

The problem starts very young and a damning international study has portrayed British children as among the least active in the world. Recommended to do at least an hour of moderate-intensity exercise every day, England and Wales are currently third-worst in the list – with Scotland at the bottom compared with 38 other nations that were studied including Venezuela and Slovenia. Just 22% of boys aged 11 to 15 manage the recommended amounts of daily exercise, and just 15% of girls. No wonder then that the latest figures suggest that nearly 20% of 10- to 11-year-olds in England are obese.

Neuroscientists are studying how doing enough physical activity to improve cardiorespiratory fitness in childhood is directly related to the structure and function of the developing brain. The neuroprotective qualities of exercise are present throughout life. Individuals in their 60s and 70s who exercise are seen to have a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s for example.

Scientists have even found evidence of exercise-related benefits even earlier in life, passed on by mothers who exercise during pregnancy, or even prior to conception.

How much exercise do children get in your country? How much time do you spend exercising? Did you do much exercise as a child? Do you think children are doing less exercise these days?

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/28/young-at-heart-why-children-who-exercise-become-healthier-adults

Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    This doesn't surprise me, and it's because all they seem to want to do is sit playing on phones and consoles. When I was growing up I would be out all the time on my bike, running around, or just walking, but kids these day's aren't the same at all.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,788 ✭✭✭✭
    Even (and this was quite a long time ago!) when I was at school they were already starting to reduce the amount of time in the timetable for sport and exercise. Then a few years later I noticed how much it had gone down again, with many schools selling off some of the land that had been used as sports fields. But when I was at school I don't remember that there were any fat kids in the school, let alone just my class. Child obesity was unknown.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    mheredge said:

    Even (and this was quite a long time ago!) when I was at school they were already starting to reduce the amount of time in the timetable for sport and exercise. Then a few years later I noticed how much it had gone down again, with many schools selling off some of the land that had been used as sports fields. But when I was at school I don't remember that there were any fat kids in the school, let alone just my class. Child obesity was unknown.

    At the very least, we always did physical education at least twice a week. For my partner's son, who has just finished school, it wasn't even compulsory to do, which I think is a real shame.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,904 ✭✭✭✭
    The gardens are beautiful and there aren't any space for setting up a tent with mom's old blankets. How has changed the world.
  • VokVok Posts: 2,132 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm not surprised either. In my childhood my neighbourhood was chock-a-block with kids of all age. Today there're only cars fill the space. We didn't have computers, mobile phones and the only entertainment could be found on the streets. On top of that, we didn't have so much food to eat. As a result, fat kids were far and few between and their obesity was hereditary.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,788 ✭✭✭✭
    Only twice a week? We had at least four lessons with 40 minutes three times a week and one double period of PE a week @GemmaRowlands.

    Once a week was swimming (in winter too, as it was an outdoor heated pool) which I used to hate, then depending on the time of year, hockey and netball, tennis and rounders, plus gym and athletics. I was pretty useless at everything, though I enjoyed netball most.

    I was lucky as I lived in a cul-de-sac so there was no through traffic. There was even a field at the end of the road, though we weren't really supposed to go in as it was a private sports' field. And then there was also a back garden, so we were lucky in that respect.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    mheredge said:

    Only twice a week? We had at least four lessons with 40 minutes three times a week and one double period of PE a week @GemmaRowlands.

    Once a week was swimming (in winter too, as it was an outdoor heated pool) which I used to hate, then depending on the time of year, hockey and netball, tennis and rounders, plus gym and athletics. I was pretty useless at everything, though I enjoyed netball most.

    I was lucky as I lived in a cul-de-sac so there was no through traffic. There was even a field at the end of the road, though we weren't really supposed to go in as it was a private sports' field. And then there was also a back garden, so we were lucky in that respect.

    Yes, just twice a week, but they were an hour long. There was also the option of going to after school sports clubs, which ran every evening, but you didn't have to do that.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,804 ✭✭✭✭
    What about the playing fields of Eton, where the battle of Waterloo was won?
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,788 ✭✭✭✭
    That's a very good question @Practical_Severard. Maybe there at least, the boys still have to run around. But I was very shocked to hear Gemma only had PE for two hours a week and that her partner's son did not have to do any if he didn't want to opt for it.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    mheredge said:

    That's a very good question @Practical_Severard. Maybe there at least, the boys still have to run around. But I was very shocked to hear Gemma only had PE for two hours a week and that her partner's son did not have to do any if he didn't want to opt for it.

    It's pretty standard these days. It was the case all the way through when I was at school. I do think it's poor that you don't have to do it at all anymore, as young people are just far too sedentary.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,788 ✭✭✭✭
    From what I gather in France, primary school children have to spend 3 hours a week and secondary school students 2 hours a week (compulsory) on physical activities, with lots of extra optional lessons. I think this is typical in most European countries

    Britain has the highest rate of child obesity in Europe. In 2001, France was the least obese country in Europe, though this is not the case any more (Romania might be the least obese currently).

    Historically, France has been known for its slender people and longevity. This has led to their role as the "nutritional role model for Europe." I live near several schools and certainly I have not seen any children, even teenagers who I would describe as obese.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    mheredge said:

    From what I gather in France, primary school children have to spend 3 hours a week and secondary school students 2 hours a week (compulsory) on physical activities, with lots of extra optional lessons. I think this is typical in most European countries

    Britain has the highest rate of child obesity in Europe. In 2001, France was the least obese country in Europe, though this is not the case any more (Romania might be the least obese currently).

    Historically, France has been known for its slender people and longevity. This has led to their role as the "nutritional role model for Europe." I live near several schools and certainly I have not seen any children, even teenagers who I would describe as obese.

    The problem is that young people think they are invincible, and they often don't realise how much they need to take care of their own health until it's just too late.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,788 ✭✭✭✭
    I think when you tend to experience good health, you forget what it is to be sick. I'm afraid I tend to be like this even though I'm not so young any more.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,904 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 7
    The 7th version of the PISA study has been released recently.
    Pisa = Program for international students assessment.
    The test takes place every 3 years.
    It's the largest international students comparative study of 15/16-year old.
    600,000 students took part from 79 countries.

    Austria is 'average' and best of all are China, Singapore, Macau, Hong Kong, Canada.
    Best Europeans are Estland, Finland/Poland.

    In 2000 Poland was sub-standart, but after freed from the Soviets they made a big reformation in their school system; new schools were built and teachers were better trained. After 12 years they reached top class.

    I couldn't find the UK, what level they reached.
    The basic was tested in reading, mathematic, natural science.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,788 ✭✭✭✭
    I reckon that the UK might be quite low. I think school isn't that popular in many places, especially in inner cities.
Sign In or Register to comment.