Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
Learn English in February

Learning English the BBC way

mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
Today I was reminded about the BBC learning English website. If you are not already familiar with it, I highly recommend checking it out for the useful videos and pages on grammar, vocabulary and listening practice.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/

In particular these 6 minute videos are great fun to watch. The English We Speak introduces you to common British English language used every day by native speakers.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english
http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak

For example 'getting hot under the collar' - http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-190819

The six minute grammar page is also very useful: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/basic-grammar

I assume the BBC learning English app still works. Much on the site has not been updated by the BBC for the last five years, but the material is still available and is very helpful for students of English.
«1

Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    @Shiny03, @Glorian (thanks for reminding me about this), @taghried, @sara-ahmed, @Naoran, @Reem.
  • taghriedtaghried Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    edited August 2019
    https://www.timeforkids.com/g34/forest-on-fire-amazon/

    I discovered this site(Time for kids) small articles and updated, Even exotic word the site highlight it and explain with pictures as well.(the latest article was about forest on fire)
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    There's lots of good material on the web @taghried. I'm sure you must have seen the British Council site too.
  • taghriedtaghried Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    yes, you're right nothing as BBC's content...

    I checked it out and found this intriguing section as well...
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/experiment/unit-1/session-1
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    I love the Korean equivalent. The three year old's habits stay till the person is eighty.

    It's a very good trick for remembering phrases like this @taghried. In your language, what is the equivalent of a leopard can't change its spots?
  • taghriedtaghried Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    It's a proverb,(Dog's tail won't be adjusted).

    It's impossible to change people's behaviours.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,791 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    I love the Korean equivalent. The three year old's habits stay till the person is eighty.

    It's a very good trick for remembering phrases like this @taghried. In your language, what is the equivalent of a leopard can't change its spots?

    Why eighty? What happens at eighty?
  • taghriedtaghried Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    He could say (the rest of person's life instead of eighty)!
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    taghried said:

    It's a proverb,(Dog's tail won't be adjusted).

    It's impossible to change people's behaviours.

    Another way to say this is 'You can't teach an old dog new tricks'. Even though I'm not sure that's always true in reality.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    I suppose this is just an example to suggest old age @Vok.
  • taghriedtaghried Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    edited August 2019
    I don't believe it either @GemmaRowlands , I guess there is no standard, we can learn or change our behaviour at any time if we want, but I reckon most of people like to categorize to make sure that everything under their control and they'll know anything from the first sight.
    ________________

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190815

    I guess it's an interesting 6Min topic..

    It's talking about (Libra) which is another electronic currency otherwise (Bitcoin) but the good thing in (Libra)_it's stable and backed up by currency.
    I expect in the future the official currency will be(cryptocurrency). there won't be a physical currency anymore!
    Post edited by taghried on
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    taghried said:

    I don't believe it either @GemmaRowlands , I guess there is no standard, we can learn or change our behaviour at any time if we want, but I reckon most of people like to categorize to make sure that everything under their control and they'll know anything from the first sight.
    ________________

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190815

    I guess it's an interesting 6Min topic..

    It's talking about (Libra) which is another electronic currency otherwise (Bitcoin) but the good thing in (Libra)_it's stable and backed up by currency.
    I expect in the future the official currency will be(cryptocurrency). there won't be a physical currency anymore!

    I think it's easier to change a habit when you're younger, but I know of lots of older people who have learned new and better ways to behave, so it definitely isn't impossible!
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    BBC English is supposed to be easy to understand. What do you think?
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    I think it's the most easy to understand English that there is, when you consider confusing regional accents, so I would always recommend BBC English for anyone learning.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    I suppose that is why I often have people say they find it very easy to understand my English. But if I speak fast, I'm sure it must be very hard.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,791 ✭✭✭✭
    BBC is easier to read than let's say The Telegraph or The Independent @mheredge .
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,366 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    I suppose that is why I often have people say they find it very easy to understand my English. But if I speak fast, I'm sure it must be very hard.

    Hugh Laurie speaks quite fast and he's harder to understand than Stephen Fry.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    Vok said:

    BBC is easier to read than let's say The Telegraph or The Independent @mheredge .

    Both of those newspapers are (or at least, were) traditional broadsheet papers.. so a lot harder to read!
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    @Vok papers like the Daily Mail or Evening Standard are much easier to read.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    Agreed! Even though the Daily Mail might not be the greatest when it comes to story quality, it is much easier to read.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,791 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge Never read Evening Standard before and the Daily Mail cheesy website puts me off.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod
    Vok said:

    @mheredge Never read Evening Standard before and the Daily Mail cheesy website puts me off.

    It's fondly known as "The Daily Fail" in the UK, which I guess doesn't fill you with confidence..
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,366 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2019

    Agreed! Even though the Daily Mail might not be the greatest when it comes to story quality, it is much easier to read.

    Actually, it's very difficult to read, but not because of the language, but because of its authors writing style. They produce long texts, often on trivial topics, by repeating points over and over, probably altering the wording. But I sometimes find their trivial theme items interesting, because they shed some light on the British everyday life, something that an insider wouln't find entertaining. The reason that I like them, is probably because that the Russian realities are so distant from the British life, while the German or French aren't, I guess. The message boards are also great to take a look at the British mentality.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    I don't know if you use Facebook @Practical_Severard but there's one very eccentric and pedantic Facebook group that has me in stitches called Extreme Pedantry (https://www.facebook.com/groups/133309454114). They're hilarious about how seriously they take the English language.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,366 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2019
    mheredge said:

    I don't know if you use Facebook @Practical_Severard but there's one very eccentric and pedantic Facebook group that has me in stitches called Extreme Pedantry (https://www.facebook.com/groups/133309454114). They're hilarious about how seriously they take the English language.

    I'm afraid it's beyond my capabilities, @mheredge . I don't know English at the Cambridge Proficiency level, so trifling with the language peculiarities isn't exactly a bright idea.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    I think you'd be surprised. Your English is better than you think @Practical_Severard.

    For example: Surely their Herne Bay store hasn’t actually “moved” to Whitstable, but to be accurate they’ve closed their Herne Bay store and opened a Whitstable one?
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,366 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    I think you'd be surprised. Your English is better than you think @Practical_Severard.



    For example: Surely their Herne Bay store hasn’t actually “moved” to Whitstable, but to be accurate they’ve closed their Herne Bay store and opened a Whitstable one?

    Well, I understand this, but until recently I haven't known the word 'scavenger' and that the right word to describe the state of a worm's body is 'retracted', that some species are 'voracios' and so on. And I can't properly follow "The Dinnerladies" series without subtitles, though I've progressed in it.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm not familiar with the Dinner Ladies but I can guess that they speak with a lot of slang or words only found in the Urban Dictionary @Practical_Severard.

    Here's another comment (we know how the Americans can't speak English properly):

    "I get absolutely brassed off by people (and coincidentally they're nearly always Americans) who create nouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs out of one of the other forms by lazily adding a quite appropriate suffix to create a bastardised word instead of going back to the root and adding the suffix.

    "Recently seen examples include "tanscendentalize" instead of "transcend" (I think the 'Z' gives the game away regarding the nationality of the writer); "lovableness" instead of "love"; and "orientate" instead of "orient".

    "I think the answer lies in Peter Cook's character, E L Wisty's observation that "I never 'ad the Latin for the Judgin'"!

    {Yes, I have just posted this on my timeline too. And I do realise my example are all stripping off unnecessary suffices. There was no need to then add a suffix in these cases.}

    So you see how pedantic some of these people are! Splitting hairs for the sake of it.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 10,331 mod

    Agreed! Even though the Daily Mail might not be the greatest when it comes to story quality, it is much easier to read.

    Actually, it's very difficult to read, but not because of the language, but because of its authors writing style. They produce long texts, often on trivial topics, by repeating points over and over, probably altering the wording. But I sometimes find their trivial theme items interesting, because they shed some light on the British everyday life, something that an insider wouln't find entertaining. The reason that I like them, is probably because that the Russian realities are so distant from the British life, while the German or French aren't, I guess. The message boards are also great to take a look at the British mentality.
    It's interesting to hear that it's more difficult to read for you. I guess I have a different opinion as I'm a native, perhaps.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,872 ✭✭✭✭
    The British mentality is a very curious topic @Practical_Severard, especially now.
Sign In or Register to comment.