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There is wind where the rose was,
Cold rain where sweet grass was,
And clouds like sheep
Stream o'er the steep
Grey skies where the lark was.

Nought warm where your hand was,
Nought gold where your hair was,
But phantom, forlorn,
Beneath the thorn,
Your ghost where your face was.

Cold wind where your voice was,
Tears, tears where my heart was,
And ever with me,
Child, ever with me,
Silence where hope was.

November by Walter de la Mare
August
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Tuesday Night Owls - 17 September 2019 - The 'Ikea effect'

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,091 Teacher
We read an article which described the 'Ikea effect': making something more difficult so that consumers value it more:

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20190422-how-the-ikea-effect-subtly-influences-how-you-spend


Vocabulary Top 10:

grail - something that you want very much but that is very hard to get or achieve

overegged - to exaggerate (a feature of something) to the point of unreasonableness

patent - an official document that gives a person or company the right to be the only one that makes or sells a product for a certain period of time

the icing on the cake - something extra that makes a good thing even better

concede - to give away (something) usually in an unwilling way; to say that you accept or do not deny the truth or existence of (something) : to admit (something) usually in an unwilling way

infuse - to cause (a person or thing) to be filled with something (such as a quality)

enthused - to show enthusiasm : to talk about something with enthusiasm

empirically - based on testing or experience

endowment - an income or form of property given or bequeathed to someone

initiation - the process of being formally accepted as a member of a group or organization : the process of being initiated


What do you think of the theory in the article?
Do you value things more if you feel you contributed to them?

@april @Bassa @Shiny03 @filauzio @medno

Comments

  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,011 mod
    I don't think that "making something more difficult so that consumers value it more" was Mr IKEA's intention.
    He wanted to make it easier for the consumers, I think.
    Easier to transport and could make consumers more creative for example with the bookshelves.
    You can make them as long, as wide as high as you will depending on the space you have.
    For experience DIY'ers is this maybe a piece of cake but for occasional one like me; it makes me proud if I watch how the shelves step by step rising and rising until they become a bookshelf. (If they don't crash to the ground again because I didn't fasten the screws well of course :D )
    It's possible that you have to restart because you've skipped some steps ( I frequently forget to read the instruction before starting due to the excitement) and you will spend a lot of time to get it right, but it's worth it.

    Nowadays a lot of things are DIY, but it's true that the instructions are so poor many times so you have to do it at random and hope that it's the correct steps.
    It's time that the producers put the consumers' needs at the first place again instead of only produce produce produce to make as many profits as possible.

  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 1,962 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Honestly, I don't think there are so many enthusiast DIYers would-be Ikea customers out there.

    I rather believe there are a lot of buyers who want to save as much money as possible, without compromising to the low as for quality.

    Before the advent of Ikea's revolution, the items of household furnitures have always been very expensive: they were usually sold as a whole set supply of single room's furnishings.

    Take for instance the bedroom: you usually bought the bed, bed-side tables, cupboard, chest of drawers, all items at the same time from the furniture seller, who presented you with an unique style furnishing proposal.

    Needless to say, such artistic assemblage, where any items matched any other, either by making material or colour or just style cost you a lot.

    Furthermore, you needn't assembling anything on your own, since every pieces was delivered to your home in its functional monolithic integrity.

    Was it too easy and almost boring a way to have every your house's rooms furnished ?

    It can be, but I prefer spending my free time lying on a beach in the sunshine, or walking in the wild or even reading a book on the couch ( an already assembled one-piece kind of obviously ).

    If you want someone to crouch down, kneel down, getting his back leaning forward trying to screw away into the countless tiny holes which dot all wooden panels you have to assemble, just for the pleasure of it... well.. you haven't got your man, really.

    I'm rather sold to thumbs' twiddling than to screwdrivers' twirling, when it comes to spend a potentially very profitable long day from sunrise to sunset.

    Unless it was for saving my money, which would totally overturn my standpoint though: in such a case I could manage some of my leisure time working with screws and relative tools.

    Nevertheless, I'm afraid, in the end, I wouldn't value my furnitures more just because I've assembled them myself.

    I think it more likely I would hold myself a guy whose initial purchase's saved money has been almost perfectly made up for by the physical hard labour and time subsequently put into it.

    That's the Ikea strategy to me: considering all the resources spent over it, just a draw.
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,156 mod
    @april - Here is your correction:-

    I don't think that "making something more difficult so that consumers value it more" was Mr IKEA's intention. I think, he actually wanted to make it easier for the consumers, and making it easier to transport could make consumers more creative, for example with the bookshelves: you can make them as long, as wide as high as you want depending on the space you have.

    For experienced DIY'ers this is maybe a piece of cake but for occasional ones like me; it makes me proud if I watch the shelves rising and rising, step by step, until they become a bookshelf. (If they don't crash to the ground again because I didn't fasten the screws well of course. :D )

    It can happen that you have to restart, because you've skipped some steps ( I frequently forget to read the instruction before starting due to the excitement) and you will spend a lot of time in trying to get it right, but it's worth it.

    Nowadays a lot of things are DIY, but it's true that the instructions are often so poor that you have to carry them out at random and hope that they are the correct steps.

    It's time that the producers put the consumers' needs first again, instead of only produce, produce, produce, in order to make as much profit as possible.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,156 mod
    @filauzio - Here is your correction:-

    Honestly, I don't think there are that many DIYers who are would-be Ikea customers out there. Rather, I believe there are a lot of buyers who want to save as much money as possible, without compromising on quality.

    Before the advent of Ikea's revolution, items of household furniture had always been very expensive: they were usually sold as a whole set of furnishing.

    Take for instance the bedroom: you usually bought the bed, bed-side tables, cupboard, chest of drawers etc, at the same time from the furniture seller, who presented you with a unique proposal on style and design.

    Needless to say, such an artistic assemblage, where all the items matched each other, either by material, colour, or style cost you a lot.

    Furthermore, you didn't have to assemble anything on your own, since every piece was delivered to your home in its functional monolithic integrity.

    Was it too easy and almost boring a way to have every room in your house furnished?

    It could be, but I prefer spending my free time lying on a beach in the sunshine, or walking in the wild, or even reading a book on the couch (a pre-assembled one-piece kind, obviously).

    If you want someone to crouch down, and kneel, back leaning forward trying to screw away into the countless tiny holes which dot all the wooden panels you have to assemble, just for the pleasure of it... well.. you haven't got your man, really.

    I'm more sold on thumbs' twiddling than screwdrivers' twirling, when it comes to spending a potentially very profitable day from sunrise to sunset.

    Unless it saves me money, which would totally change my standpoint: in such a case I could manage some of my leisure time working with screws and tools.

    Nevertheless, I'm afraid, in the end, I wouldn't value my furniture more just because I'd assembled it myself. I think it more likely I would see myself as a guy whose purchases saved money, that has been almost perfectly made up for by the physical hard labour and time subsequently put into it.

    That's the Ikea strategy to me: considering all the resources spent -just a draw.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,011 mod
    Thank you @Teach .
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,091 Teacher
    @april The worst part is when you get to the end and there are screws left over!! And you have no idea where they should have went, and if you should use the piece of furniture you just spent all that time building!

    @filauzio I admit, I have to agree. I don't think I like the furniture more just because I built it, however I do like the fact that it cost less than those matching bedroom sets!
  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 1,962 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thank you @Teach ! Know what ? It really seems like you are a native English speaker !! :D LOL

    Just today I discovered that one of the back panels of my Ikea wardrobe has come off in one point... aargh.. I'm afraid I got a few screws somewhere left over too @NatashaT. :#
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 40,664 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm not a fan of IKEA @filauzio. I find shopping in their mammoth warehouse stores an ordeal. They seem to deliberately make it very confusing, so you wander around lost, finding things you had no intention of buying. A friend had an extremely bad delivery experience with them when they didn't show up and he was left with no bed, and had no time to even get himself an emergency blow-up mattress.

    I do however like Habitat. They work on a similar principle in terms of how you order and self-assemble, but the quality is much higher. Sadly (for Brits that is) they no longer exist in the UK but happily for me, they do in France.
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