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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
Learn English in February

Monday Night Owls - 4 November 2019 - Swapping planes for trains

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,139 Teacher
We read why people are taking trains instead of planes:

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190909-why-flight-shame-is-making-people-swap-planes-for-trains


Vocabulary Top 10:

niggling - causing you to feel a slight pain or to be worried or annoyed for a long time

reinvigorate - to cause (something) to become more active and lively again; to give life and energy back to (someone)

happy-go-lucky - not worried about anything

a slew of - a large number of people or things

earthbound - located on the surface of the earth : not able to fly or to go to outer space

daunting - tending to make people afraid or less confident : very difficult to do or deal with

far-flung - located in a very distant place

buzzword - a word or phrase that becomes very popular for a period of time; Buzzwords are often related to a particular business or field of study.

to call (someone) out - to directly criticize (someone) for (something, such as bad behavior)

offset - to cancel or reduce the effect of (something) : to create an equal balance between two things


Do you prefer to fly or use other forms of transport?
Do you feel 'flight shame'?

@almog250 @aladdin @Rob_Negrete @Shiny03 @april @VictorJosé @Alexa @filauzio @Manar @Diakha @Sarraf @aza @hocon

Comments

  • almog250almog250 Posts: 33 ✭✭
    edited November 2019
    I think this depends on where you live.
    To fly is more polluting the environment but in some way, this is more easy to go form far continents.

    If you live in Europe maybe the train is a better way for Europe countries. hope someday that will be A plane that works on electricity, and this will help a lot.
  • Rob_NegreteRob_Negrete Posts: 8
    You are right @almog250, depends on where you live.

    Europe is famous because of its trains and there are connections across several countries.

    Some other countries do no have such a nice transportation; at least not to go from side to side.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,084 mod
    I fly whenever it's necessary; for a long distance journey for example.
    But it has been a long time since I took the plane last time.
    I don't only have a flight shame but also a flight fatigue, I think.
    The crowded airport and the long waiting for check in, waiting for boarding, the long flight up in the sky, the long line before passing the customs ... I prefer stay at home then and just having a relax time close from home.
    Good for my carbon footprint, right?

    The fact is that nowadays, comparing to going by train or ship or by car (or by bike), flying is easier (more choices) and cheaper (at least if you take low cost flight).
    I agree that we have to reduce our carbon footprint by reducing, among others, flying.
    Going by train is indeed interesting depending on where you take the train and where you go to.
    I really enjoyed my train trips in Japan, exploring city by city, or my boat trip from Amsterdam to Scotland or the trip in a night coach in Indonesia, but I just can't avoid flying from Amsterdam to Singapore either.
    As @almog250 suggested; maybe they could build planes which could fly without fuel.
    However, according to the article, not only the fuel is responsible for the carbon footprint but there are more factors that cause the warming effect of flying.
    So what can we do?
    Increasing flight fares has only impacts for the men in the street but not for rich people who take their private jets to go for a drink in another country at any moment.
    Could we arrange a kind of quotas for flying then?
    You have only a restricted km or miles of flying a year?
    Wishful thinking of course. :D
  • VictorJoséVictorJosé Posts: 51 ✭✭
    edited November 2019
    I understand the idea of the "flight shame movement" and agree with it. In addition, the company that I´m been working for, incentive the remote-meetings, where we using the communications tools, for instance, "Skype for Business", instead of the face-to-face meeting, which same times it´s necessary a trip.
    The individual behaviour aligned with the rules of the big companies related to their business trips contributes a lot to the reduction of the carbon foot-print. However, we cannot forget that the major polluters are the big companies from the giant economies, for instance, China and the USA, which coincidentally these countries didn´t agree to the Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement which that commits state parties to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Because of that, we won´t be a significant reduction in the carbon footprint only with the "flight shame movement", more than that it will be necessary the massive contribution of the giant economies of the World.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,084 mod
    edited November 2019
    Isn't it shameful?
    We try to not flying but Airline company Qatar Airways has recently started operating cargo flights between Maastricht and Liège, a 38 km flight of just nine minutes - for personal reasons!
    https://www.brusselstimes.com/all-news/belgium-all-news/77457/qatar-airways-operates-9-minute-flights-between-maastricht-and-liege/
  • SarrafSarraf Posts: 27 ✭✭
    I think Victor is right.
    Such a movement can be effective. But it won't have major effects unless giant economies take it seriously. It can be a spark but won't set a fire until reaching a certain threshold.
    I think most of the time this series of events lead to reform. First of all, some scientists or thoughtful people begin to realise that something is wrong with an issue. Then little by little they let other people know about what they think and it causes public opinion to change toward the issue. This step is essential for successful reforms but it's not enough. Only after the governments and great companies acknowledge the people's demands and act on it, the reforms can be fruitful. I hope it would be the same with this one
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    Hi @almog250 - Here is your correction:-

    I think this depends on where you live. To fly is more polluting to the environment but it is much easier to travel to far continents.

    If you live in Europe maybe the train is a better way for European countries. I hope someday there will be a plane that works with electricity, this will help a lot.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @Rob_Negrete - Here is your correction:-

    You are right Almog, it depends on where you live.

    Europe is famous for its trains, with connections across several countries.

    Some other countries don't have such good public transport; at least not one that goes from one side of the country to the other.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @april - Here is your correction:-

    I only fly when it's absolutely necessary; a long distance journey for example, but it has been a long time since I took a plane. I don't only have flight shame but also flight fatigue, I think: The crowded airport and the long queues for check in, waiting for boarding, the long flight up in the sky, the long line before going through customs... I prefer to stay at home and just have a relaxing time close to home.

    Good for my carbon footprint, right?

    The fact is that nowadays, when you compare going by train or ship or by car (or by bike), flying is easier (there's more choice) and cheaper (at least if you take a low cost flight).

    I agree that we have to reduce our carbon footprint by reducing, among others things, flying. Going by train is indeed interesting depending on where you take the train and where you go to.

    I really enjoyed my train trips in Japan, exploring city by city, or my boat trip from Amsterdam to Scotland or the trip on a night coach in Indonesia, but I just can't avoid flying from Amsterdam to Singapore.

    As Almog suggested; maybe they could build planes which could fly without the use of fossil fuel. However, according to the article, it is not only the fuel that is responsible for the carbon footprint, there are other factors that cause the damaging effect of flying.

    So what can we do?

    Increasing flight fares only impacts the man in the street, not rich people who take their private jets to go for a drink in another country on a whim.

    Could we arrange a kind of quotas for flying then? You have a restricted number of km or miles of flying a year?

    Wishful thinking of course.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @VictorJosé - Here is your correction:-

    I understand the idea of the "flight shame movement" and agree with it. In addition, the company that I´ve been working for, promote remote-meetings, where we use communications tools like "Skype for Business", instead of face-to-face meetings.

    Individual behaviour when aligned with the rules of the big companies related to their business trips contributes a lot to the reduction of our carbon foot-print. However, we cannot forget that the major polluters are the big companies, from the larger and growing economies, for instance, China and the USA. Coincidentally these countries didn´t sign up to the Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement that commits state parties to reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. Because of that, we won´t see a significant reduction in the carbon footprint only with the "flight shame movement". We will need more than that: we need to see a massive reduction from the giant economies of the world.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @Sarraf - Here is your correction:-

    I think Victor is right. Such a movement can be effective, but it won't have any major effect unless giant economies take it seriously. It can be a spark, but it won't start a fire until it reaches a certain threshold.

    I think most of the time these kinds of events lead to reform. First of all, some scientists or thoughtful people begin to realise that something is wrong with an issue. Then little by little they let other people know about what they think, and it causes public opinion to change toward the issue. This step is essential for successful reform, but it's not enough. Only when the governments and large companies acknowledge the people's demands and act on them can the reforms be fruitful. I hope it will be the same with this one.
  • VictorJoséVictorJosé Posts: 51 ✭✭
    Thank you so much @Teach, for your correction! It contributes a lot to build up my competence in the English language.
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