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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
Learn English in February

Marianne's 8am Tuesday 19 November 2019: Learning languages and how to become a polyglot - part two

mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,862 ✭✭✭✭
Continuing from last Friday, we will continue to discuss how we learn languages.

The seven 'secrets' of language learning are explained in this series of videos.



We will chat about what things work best for us. Everyone is different, so not everyone learns in the same way. But sometimes there are tips and tricks that we might not have come across that are worth trying. I have found the tips in the videos are not new to me, but a useful reminder of what might be worth trying out.

Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,862 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2019
    @taghried, @Shiny03, @nidhii, @Glorian, @Sarraf, @Alexandra, @Paulette, @ech0pandit Here's the video to watch before Tuesday's session. Homework in advance.
  • taghriedtaghried Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2019
    My sensation of the English language doesn't exist enough, maybe because of my input not enough! so I'm going to implement those tips and I'll see If works with me or not!

    Steve Kaufmann mentioned in the comment below the video that I can practice speaking if I have a chance to do it, although he didn't mention it in his videos.

    I'm impressed by your English @sohal_deepak , @ech0pandit , @nidhii and I read before that India has a massive number who speak English, I wonder is it because of your education system or self_learning?!
    Post edited by taghried on
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,862 ✭✭✭✭
    @taghried English is still a second language for most people in this vast continent. It is said that it is the only common language too, as there are so many different languages in India. It always amuses me how Indians from different parts of the country have to sometimes communicate with English with eachother as Hindi is not spoken everywhere. There are also quite a lot of English-medium schools, particularly private schools where they teach all or most subjects in English.
  • sohal_deepaksohal_deepak Posts: 76 ✭✭✭
    @taghried and @mheredge Interestingly, India has several languages, in fact, it is at 4th position with 453 different languages in the list of countries of most spoken languages "https://www.ethnologue.com/guides/countries-most-languages " It is at 2nd position with 1.31 Billion of population. When you travel from one state to another, it seems like you have entered into a different country because of different culture, languages, way of thinking etc. etc. Here in India, each state or community try to promote their own language so they emphasis their kids to prefer to speak the mother language only.
    Yes, you are right @mheredge, we have most of the schools are English-medium but for the namesake only. There are few reputed schools who focus on Engish of students but they are too costly and charge high amount of fee which become unaffordable for even middle-class families.
    After globalisation, there are so many MNC companies available in the country, where English is must thus everybody is now focusing to improve their English skills either by themself or by taking coachings.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,862 ✭✭✭✭
    @sohal_deepak I have met students in Darjeeling and Mussourie who speak excellent English, but I believe some of the very best schools in India are in these two towns.

    I also have come across a huge variation in accents in different parts of India.

    I will be spending a few weeks in Tamil Nadu in Janaury, where I recall English does not seen so widely understood or used as in neighbouring Kerala. But in Pondicherry I think quite a lot of Indians there speak French. This surprised me when I visited the first time, as did the Frenchness of parts of this place. I think what I loved most about Pondicherry however, was how three very different areas of the town: the Hindu, Moslem and French parts that sit side by side but were so different within a very small town. I'm looking forward to exploring the very southernmost tip of India as I have never been in this region before.
  • ech0panditech0pandit Posts: 343 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2019
    oh @mheredge nice I might be around Pondicherry, it is not very far from where I currently stay and work, my room mate is going to that place, while I'll be binge this weekend, apart from that @taghried yes people speak different languages in India, even the low level schools focus on teaching or encouraging the children to learn English not to forget that they already have regional or Hindi language in their curriculum, which is why, people of India become polyglots and they don't even know it, it is not really a big achievement for them, for example I know five languages with decent proficiency.
    I stayed in Telengana for 6-7 months and I was able to know a few words and same is here in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, although I like this place better, but from here on if I need to progress to learn Tamil or any language I have to pen down basics, this is the key secret I discovered when I was in college learning German,it might sound boring and a little bit time consuming but the results are awfully unbelievable when you start writing the details.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,862 ✭✭✭✭

    oh @mheredge nice I might be around Pondicherry, it is not very far from where I currently stay and work. My room mate is going to that place, while I'll be binge (?) this weekendB> Apart from that @taghried, yes people speak different languages in India, even the low level schools focus on teaching or encouraging the children to learn English, not to forget that they already have regional or the Hindi language in their curriculum, which is why people of India become polyglots and they don't even know it. It is not really a big achievement for them. For example I know five languages with decent proficiency.

    I stayed in Telengana for 6-7 months and I was able to get to know a few words and the same here in Chennai, and Tamil Nadu. Although I like this place better, but from here on if I need to progress to learn Tamil or any language I have to write down basics. This is the key secret I discovered when I was in college learning German. It might sound boring and a little bit time consuming but the results are unbelievable when you start writing.

    @ech0pandit here are a few corrections. Watch out for punctuation. You might find it a lot easier to write shorter sentences.
  • ech0panditech0pandit Posts: 343 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2019
    Thanks @mheredge. Chennai is a city in Tamil Nadu state.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 41,862 ✭✭✭✭
    I visited Chennai six years ago when I went to see a friend there. I will have to go there briefly when I fly back to London in January.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @taghried - Here is your correction:-

    My feeling for the English language isn't strong enough, maybe because of not enough input, so I'm going to implement these tips and I'll see if it works for me, or not.

    Steve Kaufmann mentioned in the comment below the video that I can practice speaking if I have a chance to do it, although he didn't mention it in his videos.

    I'm impressed by your English @sohal_deepak , @ech0pandit , @nidhii and I read before that India has a massive number of people who speak English. I wonder if it is because of your education system or through self-learning.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @sohal_deepak - Here is your correction:-

    Interestingly, India has several languages, in fact, it is in 4th position in the list of countries with the most spoken languages, with 453 different languages "https://www.ethnologue.com/guides/countries-most-languages". It is in 2nd position with a population of 1.31 billion.

    When you travel from one state to another, it seems like you have entered into a different country, because of the different culture, languages, way of thinking etc. Here in India, each state or community tries to promote their own language, so they bring up their kids to prefer to speak the mother language only.

    Yes, you are right @mheredge, most of the schools teach in English, but they only pay lip-service to this. There are a few reputable schools that focus on English, but they are too costly and charge high fees which are unaffordable, even for middle-class families.

    Because of globalisation, there are so many MNC companies in the country, where English is a must, and so everybody is now focusing on improving their English skills, either by themselves or by taking lessons.
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