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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
Learn English in February

Monday Night Owls - 13 January 2020 - Are nightmares good or bad for you?

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,139 Teacher
We read two articles which discussed whether nightmares are good or bad for you, and why:

https://time.com/5287932/are-nightmares-bad-for-you/

https://edition.cnn.com/2015/10/21/health/nightmares-health-benefits/index.html


Vocabulary Top 7:

annihilation - completely destroyed or defeated

rehash - to talk about, discuss, or think about (something) again

ameliorate - to make (something, such as a problem) better, less painful, etc.

pseudo - not real or genuine; fake

pooch - a dog (informal)

bogeyman - an imaginary monster that is used to frighten children

jarring - having an unpleasant, annoying, or disturbing effect



Do you see nightmares as positive or negative experiences?
What is the strangest nightmare you have had?
Do you know any techniques to get rid of nightmares?

@taghried @april @Monik @Shiny03 @Bassa @Alexa @almog250

Comments

  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,084 mod
    Maybe I'm one of the lucky people who rarely has nightmares.
    A bad dream which I call it a nightmare must be when I'm dreaming that I have to run, because a monster or bad person is after me or it could also that I have to run because I'm late for work!
    These nightmares happen at night and during the day as well when I take a nap.
    Very tiring and I'm happy that I'm able to wake up from those nightmares.
    I always wonder; what happens if I'm not able to escape? Should I ......?
  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 1,992 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I vaguely remember having had terrible nightmares during my childhood, although I suspect it is just a matter of course for children or adolescents.

    As an adult I never had scary nightmares: maybe it has also to do with the fact I don't like watching thrilling or horror movies, which invariably keep you constantly on the edge of the chair for the next bloodshed.

    Such movies can be full of creepy or openly gruesome sequences like of zoombies having banquets on living persons' fleshes or maybe of a well bundled-up mummy trying to grasp you, while wheezing, staggering, groping along candle-lit passages of an Egyptian Pharaoh's tomb's maze.

    Urgh.. after depicting this scary scene in my mind, I had to check my shoulders twice for any presence of a bony bandaged hand..

    Nowadays there's just one occasion when I can end up sleeping bad and wriggle throughout the night: that's when I have got garlic in one of my dishes during the previous dinner.

    In this respect, to me garlic acts a s a nightmare's trigger, despite the fact I like its taste and it doesn't frighten me at all; in short garlic isn't an emotional trauma to me, not at all.

    I think it makes perfectly sense that after a big trauma you suffer from recurring nightmares; I think, for instance, of people who had one of their relatives, maybe even the son or daughter, dead in a plane crash or road accident.

    It is the way your brain try to get rid of the unsustainable sufferings which really sometimes must be going beyond human bearing capacity.

    You have to go back to any frames of such terrible experience and linger over it, again and again, keep hovering over it until you come up with an explanation whatever, anything which could give you just a hold to go on in life.

    Your brain has the ability to level any grief given due time; when the suffering is excessive, though, you need help and going back to the trauma during the day too can speed the elaboration process.

    Nevertheless, in my trauma-less case, since I tend always to oversleep, an healthy sleep disruptive nightmare can result beneficial, at least, to comply to wake up time.

    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,084 mod
    Last night I had a kind of nightmare.
    I was working in the hospital and was responsible for a patient who just had a severe operation.
    The patient suffered a lot of pain so I gave him an injection with analgesic; a kind of morfine.
    Nothing special happened, but suddenly I had a bad feeling.
    I asked myself: "Didn't I give him too many painkiller?
    I didn't give him an overdose, did I?"
    I tried to find the doctor's instruction between the jumble of papers, but I couldn't find it.
    I became anxious and afraid that I made a big mistake!
    Luckily, I woke up and realised that it was only a nightmare.
    It was 2am.

    I don't know why I had this bad dream about working since I have been retired for years now!
    I'm sure this article and my previous short story about nightmares have something to do with it. :D
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,139 Teacher
    Apparently talking about nightmares causes nightmares too @april ! :s maybe we should read an article about winning the lottery to see if it makes it happen too? :D

    I'm glad it was just a dream though, and that normally your bad dreams aren't really 'nightmare' level.
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,139 Teacher
    @filauzio you know a lot about horror movies for someone who doesn't watch them! :D Did you have any nightmares after describing those scenes to us? Does the garlic cause bad dreams, or just bad sleep?

    Nightmares are definitely more logical after a traumatic event. I think they could be even more likely if you are trying to ignore that event during the day when you are awake - as soon as you fall asleep, your brain has the opportunity to think about what it really wanted to focus on but you didn't allow it to. Hopefully though, having those nightmares can help in the recovery process and reduce your suffering, both during the day and night.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @Hermine - here is your correction:-

    Maybe I'm one of those lucky people who rarely has nightmares. To me a bad dream, which is what I call a nightmare, is when I'm dreaming that I have to run, because a monster or bad person is after me, or it could also be that I have to run because I'm late for work!

    These nightmares don't just happen at night, but during the day as well when I take a nap. It is very tiring and I'm happy when I'm able to wake up from those nightmares.
    I always wonder; what would happen if I wasn't able to escape? Should I ......?
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @filauzio - Here is your correction:-

    I vaguely remember having had terrible nightmares during my childhood, although I suspect it is just a matter of course for children and adolescents.

    As an adult I never have scary nightmares: maybe it has also to do with the fact I don't like watching thrillers or horror movies, which invariably keep you constantly on the edge of your seat for the next bit of bloodshed.

    Such movies can be full of creepy or openly gruesome sequences; zombies feasting on a living persons' flesh, or maybe a well bundled-up mummy trying to grab you, while wheezing, staggering, and groping along candle-lit passages in an Egyptian Pharaoh's tomb's maze.

    Urgh.. after depicting this scary scene in my mind, I had to check my shoulders twice for any presence of a bony, bandaged hand.

    Nowadays there's just one occasion when I can end up sleeping badly and wriggling throughout the night: that's when I have had garlic in one of my dishes during dinner. For me garlic acts like a nightmare trigger, despite the fact I like its taste and it doesn't frighten me at all; honestly, garlic isn't an emotional trauma to me, not at all.

    I think it makes perfect sense that after a big trauma you suffer from recurring nightmares; for instance, people who have lost a relative, maybe even their son or daughter, in a plane crash or road accident.

    It is the way your brain tries to make sense of unbearable suffering which really must be beyond the capacity of any human to withstand.

    You have to go back over such terrible experiences, again and again, and keep hovering over them until you come up with an explanation, anything which could give you a reason to carry on.

    Your brain has the ability to level any grief given enough time; when the suffering is excessive, though, you need help and going back to the trauma during the day too can speed the process.

    Nevertheless, in my trauma-less case, since I tend to oversleep a lot, a healthy sleep-disruptive nightmare can be beneficial, forcing me to wake up on time.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,315 mod
    @april - Here is your correction:-

    Last night I had a kind of nightmare: I was working in a hospital and was responsible for a patient who had just had a serious operation. The patient was in a lot of pain so I gave him an injection containing an analgesic; a kind of morphine. Nothing special happened, but suddenly I had a bad feeling.

    I asked myself: "Did I give him too many painkillers? I didn't give him an overdose, did I?"

    I tried to find the doctor's instructions among the jumble of papers, but I couldn't find them. I became anxious and afraid that I had made a big mistake!
    Luckily, I woke up and realised that it was only a nightmare.

    It was 2am.

    I don't know why I had this bad dream about working, since I have been retired for years now!

    I'm sure this article and my previous short story about nightmares have something to do with it.
  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 1,992 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I recall watching the first movie of the series called ' The mummy ', ( maybe you would now call it the prequel ) intending not your mother but the dead person all wrapped up in bandages, @NatashaT.

    At the time, I admit, it was a bit scary, especially because there were a lot of tension and open-mouthed anticipation of such corpse to rise to their feet and grabbing your shoulders with their cold hands.

    Now, it could be just a bandaged garlic clove which could scare and roll me off the bed with terror.

    In such case, though, the garlic is just an heavy food to digest by itself. Nevertheless, the fact my stomach is fighting with it is reflected upon my brain in some way; my neurons, then, in turn, keep wriggling endlessly: that's where such intricate meaningless dreams come conjured up in the shape of nightmares.

    I suppose this is the triggering mechanism, plus or minus. ;)
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
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