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In the merry month of May
When green leaves begin to spring,
Little lambs do skip like fairies,
Birds do couple, build, and sing.
A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
Learn English in May

Household advice

Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
edited January 23 in Home and Family
Xanthippe said:

@Practical_Severard, I don't think one boiler for the whole house is a customary solution here. I have never heard of it.

A four times larger boiler is generally cheaper to install and to run than four small ones, that’s a general rule. But it works in the technical dimension, while the legal and marketing ones may change the game, if you’re about to offer the flat to let, then you have to take them into account. Probably you are unwilling to provide utilities to your tenants instead of the usual service companies, probably they’re unwilling to buy them from you either preffering to have a separate account with the aforesaid providers, that’s something that only you can decide on.
Xanthippe said:

To get municipal hot water I would need an extra installation that goes through chimneys. It could turn out that my chimneys are not in a good condition either (I mean inside :) ).
Well, gas installation may be working in the attic. :) I have to ask a plumber. If so I would install a gas heater. They are cheaper.
Oh no, I don't want to have a tankless electric heater - I am trying to make out which options I have.
I could enlarge a bathroom but it's not the best solution either for my nerves or my purse. :(:(:(

So you have several options which you can compare against each other in terms of capital costs, time to install, running expenses, running time and safety wise. Enlarging a bathroom might be not so expensive as laying a gas pipe there, I guess. Here we have to employ a service provider's workers only for anything concerning the pipeline gas, so it’s expensive and time consuming, but your situation may differ. But the pipeline gas kW*h (or a BTU a kilocalory or whatever) of thermal energy is way cheaper than the one produced with electric power, but again it all depends on your local prices. The district hot water is the safest option, followed by a tank electric heater then by a tankless (larger current > higher fire danger) while the gas firing one is most dangerous, not least because of the fact that tenants aren’t usually the most accurate people.
Xanthippe said:

4kW is contracted power. But we used to have four meters and four bills so it may potentially be even 4*4. :( I don't know. It's contracted power versus connection power. I have just sent an official question concerning the possibility of three-phase connection to my provider. They have to answer irrespective of the fact that I am a lady. :) And I will know at last what connection power I have.

While I don’t quite grasp the difference between the connection and contracted power I guess that you could find this information in your contract with the electric company. Or even from the writing on the incoming rocker switch. But a question isn’t a bad thing. But you don’t need a 3-phase connection, you just need a connection of enough power. Having a separate meter for the tenants may be reasonable not because of the water heater only, but because your prospective customers wouldn’t be afraid of you cheating them on utilities bills.

Comments

  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 2,075 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Wow, @Practical_Severard, you are very professional. I need more time to digest it.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 28
    Xanthippe said:

    Wow, @Practical_Severard, you are very professional. I need more time to digest it.

    Oh, no, please, don't mention it. I just have the experience of building a house of my own.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,393 ✭✭✭✭
    I dreading to see if my ceiling paint has deteriorated while I have been away. I didn't have time to get a second opinion on whether water was coming from the flat above. When I get back, I'll need to check it out. There will be no point repainting the ceiling if there is a leak from above.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    @Xanthippe , connecting a 3 phase flow-through water boiler to three separate one-phase connections isn't going to work: the neutral conductor will have a triple current. There are (theoretically) possibilities which depend highly on the inner nuances of the heater, but there's a doubt one can get them from the manual, so this variant is ruled out.
  • XanthippeXanthippe Posts: 2,075 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard , ok. I got it. Well, I will call an acquainted plumber - he should know at least if gas installation is working there. A gas heater would do perhaps.
    If not, a one-phase boiler...

    Well, my friend has recommended me a builder. He was supposed to come today at midday but he didn't. :( That's life for you.

    It was my grandfather who built this house, you know. He was a very good engineer but he used to change concepts while working. Some strange problems may emerge. :)

    As for bills, the tenants pay a fixed price - I have only one water meter for the whole house, etc. So I can't cheat. :) If people are normal that's OK. Sometimes I have to pay more, sometimes less.
    And I have nothing against visitors staying for some days.
    The main thing is not to earn a lot of money but simply to live quietly. I could have some noisy students and more money and then the whole flat demolished. :(


    @mheredge , several years ago we had the same problem. There were leaks in the bathroom under our flat, i.e. in my grandmother's flat. It turned out that a bathtub pipe was broken. My mum had to pay for repainting a ceiling, etc.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    I dreading to see if my ceiling paint has deteriorated while I have been away. I didn't have time to get a second opinion on whether water was coming from the flat above. When I get back, I'll need to check it out. There will be no point repainting the ceiling if there is a leak from above.

    If it's a leak then you'll have to have all the plaster and putty chiselled away up to the concrete slab, to have the place desinfected and redone. All these are necessary to get rid of mildew, which harms a person's health.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    Xanthippe said:


    Well, my friend has recommended me a builder. He was supposed to come today at midday but he didn't. :( That's life for you.

    That's pretty common here two, especially with individuals or small companies. They never turn down a customer, but always choose the most lucrative contract without dropping a word to the others. Though, the customer also seldom telephone not-selected contractors: " I won't be hiring you'.

    Those people who do decoration/general construction jobs are often ready to take up plumbing or electric wiring. This is OK if it's a flat with simple jobs like putting in wall sockets or a facets, but if the job means building a system, then the appropriate knowledge is necessary. And those people often don't have them, though their handwork skills maybe awesome. On the other hand, electricians and plumbers often don't have the skills to accurately drill a hole or to chisel a wall chase. And they typically spend days, not weeks on a project, therefore they always in a hurry. So the best strategy would be giving the holes and chases jobs to the first and assembling systems to the second, but it requires careful planning ahead, what is a rather advanced skill
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,393 ✭✭✭✭
    My brother-in-law has taken up a new line of business as a decorator. He has been giving me some excellent advice on how to tackle my ceiling paint problem. Strange to say, I'm actually now quite looking forward to rolling up my sleeves when I get back next week and repainting my ceiling where the paint's come down.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    My brother-in-law has taken up a new line of business as a decorator. He has been giving me some excellent advice on how to tackle my ceiling paint problem. Strange to say, I'm actually now quite looking forward to rolling up my sleeves when I get back next week and repainting my ceiling where the paint's come down.

    Oh, yes, that's a "grateful" job, e.g. it's results are very perceptible.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,393 ✭✭✭✭
    Fortunately the ceiling is a brilliant white, so it shouldn't be difficult to manage a passable job without having to paint the whole ceiling @Practical_Severard. It's a large room and I have already been quoted a price of over a thousand euros to have the whole ceiling repainted.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 3
    mheredge said:

    Fortunately the ceiling is a brilliant white, so it shouldn't be difficult to manage a passable job without having to paint the whole ceiling @Practical_Severard. It's a large room and I have already been quoted a price of over a thousand euros to have the whole ceiling repainted.

    I agree, when you've turned on the overhead you don't see many faulty places. But inspecting if the ceiling is wet in that place is important. Wet putty isn't going to stay in place. Neither is plaster. If mildew builds up you're going to have an abominable black stain. Correcting all these isn't cheap and easy because the steps aren't limited to painting.

    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 3
    This is wall grinding to achieve high quality painting job:

    https://st3.depositphotos.com/11313600/15973/v/600/depositphotos_159736830-stock-video-a-woman-grinds-walls-and.mp4

    The woman is using a hand light, though they often use a powerful floodlight on a tripod.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,393 ✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard There are no marks at all; the plaster under the paint that's falling off is visible and is a pinky colour. When an 'expert' came to check it out, he said it was dry. My brother-in- law suggested that possibly the plaster hadn't been prepared properly. He suggested that I put a diluted coat of paint (40% water) and then undercoat and top coat. I've taken photos and when I get back I'll be able to see if there's any deterioration since I left the place two months ago.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,564 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 6
    mheredge said:

    @Practical_Severard There are no marks at all; the plaster under the paint that's falling off is visible and is a pinky colour.

    This pinkish colour is probably a primer.But anyway, you'll have to remove everything falling off before starting off with something new. I think you'll see all what's going on at this stage.
    mheredge said:

    When an 'expert' came to check it out, he said it was dry. My brother-in- law suggested that possibly the plaster hadn't been prepared properly. He suggested that I put a diluted coat of paint (40% water) and then undercoat and top coat. I've taken photos and when I get back I'll be able to see if there's any deterioration since I left the place two months ago.

    I think that a bit of paint won't stay too long on a falling off base, but you might be well able to sort the things out by yourself.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,393 ✭✭✭✭
    Yesterday I visited my old house in London where the management agency has been doing a lot of work, renovating the kitchen and sorting out plumbing and electrical problems. It's looking good now, but the shower room still needs a bit of attention and the outside wall will need to be attended to in the not too distant future.
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