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In the merry month of May
When green leaves begin to spring,
Little lambs do skip like fairies,
Birds do couple, build, and sing.
A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
Learn English in May

Would you rent out your clothes?

TeachTeach Your TeacherHomePosts: 10,430 mod
I just saw a news report about a website called "Rent my Wardrobe".

https://www.rentmywardrobe.com/

The idea is you take photographs of your clothes, and put them up for "rent". Of course it would be absolutely no use for me: they are only interested in "designer clothing".
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Comments

  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 1
    I think most women here wouldn't use a service like this citing hygienic reasons, though they may borrow something from a friend, so a degree of trust is necessary. My daughter and wife bought similar pairs of designer shoes, but it was the DD who worn out the both pairs. "Mummy, don't your wear the shoes?" she said after she had worn out hers "So I will."
    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,765 ✭✭✭✭
    I am sure celebrities borrow expensive gowns.

    At New Year's Eve I wore a glitter frock. My youngest girl meant, mum you look like a disco ball.
    That was it.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm borrowing some of my mother's warm clothes. She's also given me a pair of shoes that are rather nice.

    I remember once finding a very nice designer jacket in a second hand clothes shop. I had no shame wearing it.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,765 ✭✭✭✭
    Big rich cities have the best second hand shops.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,963 ✭✭✭✭
    I don't think there will be much demand for my clothes. Even the homeless seem to be a bit picky about my clothes when I throw it away.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    Same here @Vok. I'm not sure if many people would like to be seen dead in my clothes.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,765 ✭✭✭✭
    haha, we want Chanel, Dior, Valentino ....
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 5
    I've come to think that Valentino ia tacky because of that dreadful large "VLTN" logo they're putting on the fronts of their expensive dresses like they were T-shirts. (After I bought an anniversary present to my wife, a local chain has been plugging its merchandise on this site to me.)
    Vltn
    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    It's a shame @Practical_Severard. It's a nice dress but for the logo.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,430 mod
    I am not a fan of being a walking advertisement for companies.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    Teach said:

    I am not a fan of being a walking advertisement for companies.

    Add to this that the asking price is £2000-2500 for those dresses. Though, here there is the customer for such merchandise. They want to show everyone they can afford that.
  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,765 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 16
    I don't like lending my shoes. Each foot has a different shape. When my kids were small they never had to wear their sister's shoes. But I had.
    I remember well we were on a school outing at a zoo and I wore shoes worn by my sister before, it was awful to wear them. Each ups and downs hurt.

    There was also a time when I wore my mothers shoes with a small heel. I felt so womanly. I wore them at home just for playing about.
    Post edited by Hermine on
  • VokVok Posts: 1,963 ✭✭✭✭
    I wouldn't rent out my shoes either @Hermine or I'd rather not take them back. Not because some people may have a different foot shape, but what if they have cheesy feet.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    Vok said:

    I wouldn't rent out my shoes either @Hermine or I'd rather not take them back. Not because some people may have a different foot shape, but what if they have cheesy feet.

    I think that ladies are different in this dimension, @Vok. However, this office's cloakroom sometimes smells as barracks because of the change footwear* left there and I'm not sure that's due to the men's boots only. At least until a ventilation system was installed there. Another thing: they have to remove refused ladies shoes on a regular basis: cheap sales are to blame.

    The employees here are required to change their footware before going inside the office, since it crucial to keep the floor clean, especially in winter when there are snow on the ground.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,963 ✭✭✭✭
    I don't think that ladies are too different @Practical_Severard . I'm not sure they suffer from cheesy feet less than men. Also I don't think it takes long for shoes to absorb the reek from the feet so even frequently changing them won't solve the problem.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    Vok said:

    I don't think that ladies are too different @Practical_Severard . I'm not sure they suffer from cheesy feet less than men.

    They probably don't, but I suspect that some men don't wash their feet as frequently as most women.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    How often do men shower @Practical_Severard? Surely they must wash their feet as often as the rest of their body? Or are you suggesting that some men don't wash very often?

    I wear cotton or wool socks when I wear socks. I think maybe this helps, only I think synthetic socks might make feet smell more. And of course, I would never wear socks a second day except perhaps thick hiking socks.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    Or are you suggesting that some men don't wash very often?

    Yes, exactly this. I can't speak for all men, but I think daily or at least once in two days is the norm for urban men. Though, in a a group of tens of men you can often find a stinky.

  • HermineHermine Posts: 8,765 ✭✭✭✭
    I stand up for wooly socks. They can be worn a long time until they stay alone. haha.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    Are you suggesting that ten percent of guys are stinkers @Practical_Severard? Though maybe if you include teenage boys, I'm sure you're right.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 18
    mheredge said:

    Are you suggesting that ten percent of guys are stinkers @Practical_Severard? Though maybe if you include teenage boys, I'm sure you're right.

    Well, ten percent is probably too high, but yes, I include teenage boys also. In this country the conscription military service has been fighting this bad habit, because stinkers are dealt harshly by fellow soldiers or officers.
    They have to face the neccessity to look after themselves, to sew in loose buttons or spare undercollars and some haven't beentaught this in the family.
    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    Undercollars @Practical_Severard? What are these? This sounds like something from the past.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 18
    mheredge said:

    Undercollars @Practical_Severard? What are these? This sounds like something from the past.

    These are strips of white cotton cloth sewed under a military uniform jacket collar. They absorb grease, sweat and dust keeping the collar clean. Though they're meant to be washed, soldiers would rather dump them and sew in a new one. If they can afford that, of course. They usually have a whip-round to buy the cloth. An undercollar is to be ripped off, washed, ironed and resewn daily. When one is washed the used side becomes less white, so they sew it in other side up. Since the strip is usually twice-folded it gives four surfaces or four days of wear. Cleanliness is checked twice a day, during the morninig inspection by an officer and in the evening by a petty officer.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard I sort of guessed it had to be something like this, but I think if they were ever a feature of uniforms in Britain, this must have gone out a long time ago.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    if they were ever a feature of uniforms in Britain, this must have gone out a long time ago.

    Yes, you don't really need them if you can afford a washing machine in the battlefield. So if there were a major trench war those undercollars would find their second life.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    Interestingly it does seem to be more of a Russian thing according to wiki @Practical_Severard. There is a guide how to make them going back to the 1970s that is stored by Nebraska University however!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podvorotnichok

    https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=5248&context=extensionhist
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 19
    mheredge said:

    Interestingly it does seem to be more of a Russian thing according to wiki @Practical_Severard.

    Germans (Halsbinde and Kragenbinde) and Austrians used to have them as well, @mheredge. A sort of Japanese boys' school uniform also uses a type of this


    To explore such peculiarities in more depth check this link Footwraps
    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 19
    Seriously speaking on the topic, I think the only novelty of this business is that's virtualised and just like Uber provides information services only. They don't have a show-room, don't hire seamstresses to fit the garments in, take up the care for the garments and so on. On the other hand, there are lots of offline places, including fashion boutiques, which do all the latter and have been renting out designer clothes for decades.

    I don't know but I think that most customers would prefer renting from a place where items are cared for, but millenials have a different view of the world. I heard that designer clothes nowdays are often rented only for an Instagram post and some non-celebrity women hire a professional photographer to take pictures of them for Instagram. Though the needs of a convential socialite are theoretically well cared by a rental service. I know that appearing in the same garments twice is frowned upon in these circles, but I believe that appearing in a rented dress is frowned upon even more, while the best things-for-rent in the town are well-known to anyone.

    BTW how many drycleanings can a dress endure?
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 43,437 ✭✭✭✭
    I suppose for a fancy dress party however, no one would think twice about hiring a costume @Practical_Severard.
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