Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

In the merry month of May
When green leaves begin to spring,
Little lambs do skip like fairies,
Birds do couple, build, and sing.
A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
Learn English in May

Tuesday Night Owls - 18 February 2020 - Kids' shopping carts - good or bad?

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,172 Teacher
We read two articles which discussed stores who have kids' shopping carts and whether they are positive or negative additions to the stores:

https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2020/02/kids-little-shopping-carts/606175/

http://www.startribune.com/target-removes-kids-shopping-carts-after-litany-of-complaints/394342101/


Vocabulary Top 10:

tailored - to make or change (something) so that it meets a special need or purpose

steer - to control the direction in which something (such as a ship, car, or airplane) moves

relish - enjoyment of or delight in something; a feeling of liking something

dodge - to move quickly to one side in order to avoid being hit by (someone or something); to move quickly in order to avoid being hit, seen, stopped, etc.

toting - to carry (something)

enamored - in a state in which you love, admire, or are very interested in something or someone

rife - very common and often bad or unpleasant; having a large amount of (something bad or unpleasant) : full of (something bad or unpleasant)

blindsided - to surprise or shock (someone) in a very unpleasant way; to hit (someone who is facing in another direction) suddenly and very hard

meltdown - a very fast loss of emotional self-control; tantrum, breakdown

cacophony - unpleasant loud sounds


Do you think these mini shopping carts for kids are a good or bad idea? Why?
What would be a better way to keep children happy while their parents do the grocery shopping?


@aladdin @oscar001 @april @Bassa @Shiny03 @Manar @Alexa @VictorJosé

Comments

  • oscar001oscar001 Posts: 94 ✭✭✭
    As an easy-going person I got enamored right away by the idea of having little kids entertained with whatever it is while you shop around relaxed. The plan is perfect, they have fun and you make the most of your shopping time. It seems brilliant, but in fact there are some drawbacks as some studies suggest. As an example, there has been some "unplanned events resulting in harm" (definition of accident) for shoppers who get upset with the kids and what's worse, with the grocery store. That is definitely the last outcome the supermarket is aiming at, angry customers.
    Consequently, some grocery stores are changing their kid-size carts policy. However, there could be a solution. The supermarket could mark an area just for those tiny carts so that you know when you are in a risky zone and relax in the rest of the shop.
    Alternatively, a playground somewhere in the grocery store would delight the younger kids.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,163 mod
    edited February 24
    Honestly, I prefer to go shopping without kids especially very young kids, toddlers.
    I could then do my shopping fastly and peacefully.
    It doesn't matter with or without tiny carts.

    I don't think making tiny carts available for children in a supermarket is a really good idea.
    It is asking for problem.
    What if there is not enough carts for all the children? That will be a lot of crying and angry kids (I WANT A CART TOO!!! ), frustated parents (mothers!), a lot of shouting and reproaching from customers and shop assistants.
    Go shopping for parents (mothers!) is sometimes already a burden, they have to do it in a whim between one and another (house)work.
    With this extra frustration, there is a big possibility that they will forget a lot of the articles in their shopping list and just realise it when they return home. :o

    Of course there are also nice and calm children, who you can go shopping with ungrudgingly. :D
    An advice for mothers; ask the fathers to come with you and the children and let them take care of the kids, with or without mini shopping carts.
    Post edited by april on
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,172 Teacher
    @oscar001 the idea that a certain part of the store would be reserved just for these tiny carts makes me imagine a supermarket with a go-kart track or bumper cars in the middle of it :D That would definitely keep the kids occupied (and probably a lot of adults too - right @Bassa ? :D )
    I think with everything, if they were used correctly, they could be a good thing - but in the hands of a bored/tired/frustrated child, the opposite would be true!
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,172 Teacher
    @april do you think an 'adult's only' supermarket would be a good idea then? I think shopping would be easier if it was the only thing you needed to concentrate on while you are there. Maybe instead of the tiny carts (or along with them?) the supermarket could provide babysitters, who can go with you around the supermarket and make sure the children are happy and occupied. I don't think that would be very cost effective for the supermarket though!
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,163 mod
    I won't go that far, @NatashaT.
    I don't think adult's only supermarket is necessary.
    Adults have to decide themselves how they like to go shopping, but they have to take the responsibility.
    If a kid makes any problem in a supermarket the adults have to keep him/her under control and they have to be ready to accept comments and disapproving looks from annoyed customers.
    This kind of problem with kids happen sometimes in restaurants too.
    I remember last summer, a restaurant owner didn't allow children in his restaurant anymore because some of them annoyed other customers and causing a lot of damage to the furniture.
    Few people blamed him as a not child-loving restaurant owner, but isn't it the responsibility of the parents that children behave?
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,429 mod
    Hi @oscar001 - Here is your correction:-

    As an easy-going person I was enamoured right away by the idea of having little kids entertained with whatever it is while you shop around relaxed. The plan is perfect, they have fun and you make the most of your shopping time. It seems brilliant, but in fact there are some drawbacks as some studies suggest. For example, there have been some "unplanned events resulting in harm" (definition of accident) for shoppers who get upset with the kids and what's worse, with the grocery store. That is definitely the last thing the supermarket is aiming for, angry customers.

    Consequently, some grocery stores are changing their kid-size carts policy. However, there could be a solution. The supermarket could mark an area just for those tiny carts so that you know when you are in a risky zone and can relax in the rest of the shop.

    Alternatively, a playground somewhere in the grocery store would delight the younger kids.
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,429 mod
    @april - Here is your correction:-

    Honestly, I prefer to go shopping without kids, especially very young kids, and toddlers. I can then do my shopping quickly and peacefully. With or without tiny carts.

    I don't think making tiny carts available for children in a supermarket is a really good idea. It is asking for problems.

    What if there are not enough carts for all the children? That will lead to a lot of crying and angry kids (I WANT A CART TOO!!! ), frustrated parents (mothers!), a lot of shouting and reproach from customers and shop assistants alike.

    Going shopping is sometimes already a burden for parents (usually mothers!); they have to do it on a whim, in between one thing and another bit of (house)work. With this extra frustration, there is a big possibility that they will forget a lot of the articles on their shopping list and only realise it when they get home.

    Of course there are also nice, calm children, who you can go shopping with ungrudgingly.

    A piece of advice for mothers; ask the fathers to come with you and the children and let them take care of the kids, with or without mini shopping carts.
  • oscar001oscar001 Posts: 94 ✭✭✭
    Teach said:

    Hi @oscar001 - Here is your correction:-

    As an easy-going person I was enamoured right away by the idea of having little kids entertained with whatever it is while you shop around relaxed. The plan is perfect, they have fun and you make the most of your shopping time. It seems brilliant, but in fact there are some drawbacks as some studies suggest. For example, there have been some "unplanned events resulting in harm" (definition of accident) for shoppers who get upset with the kids and what's worse, with the grocery store. That is definitely the last thing the supermarket is aiming for, angry customers.

    Consequently, some grocery stores are changing their kid-size carts policy. However, there could be a solution. The supermarket could mark an area just for those tiny carts so that you know when you are in a risky zone and can relax in the rest of the shop.

    Alternatively, a playground somewhere in the grocery store would delight the younger kids.

    Thank you for your help @Teach . I appreciate it.
Sign In or Register to comment.