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In the merry month of May
When green leaves begin to spring,
Little lambs do skip like fairies,
Birds do couple, build, and sing.
A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
Learn English in May

Tuesday Night Owls - 25 February 2020 - How to leave a family business

NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,175 Teacher
We read an article about how to leave a family business:

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200204-how-to-leave-a-family-business


Vocabulary Top 10:

to strike out - to begin a course of action

crop up - to come or appear when not expected

woes - problems or troubles

schism - a division among the members of a group that occurs because they disagree on something

pit against (verb) - to cause (someone or something) to fight or compete against (another person or thing)

festering - to become worse as time passes

perpetuating - to cause (something that should be stopped, such as a mistaken idea or a bad situation) to continue

start from scratch - start from a point at which nothing has been done yet

poach - to take (something, such as an idea, or someone, such as an employee or customer) from someone else illegally or unfairly

step up to the plate - take action in response to an opportunity or crisis


Have you ever worked in a family business?
Do you think it would be easier or more difficult to resolve problems in a family business compared to a regular one?

@Bassa @april @Alexa @almog250 @Manar @Shiny03 @Diakha @hocon @oscar001

Comments

  • oscar001oscar001 Posts: 94 ✭✭✭
    I've never worked in a family business. However, I've seen close friends working in family businesses. I think that on the one hand, minor problems can be resolved in an easier way. On the other hand, when it comes to make important decisions where some money is put at risk (to give an example) that could end up breaking up relationships.
    I see @NatashaT that you call "working for a company with no family members" a regular business. I've read somewhere that two thirds of companies are family companies. Therefore, it should be the other way round ie regular company should be a family company.
    Anyhow, I'm not so certain about it and maybe looking a little bit into it we could get to understand why they say so. I mean, maybe they consider that a 200 staff company owned by two sisters as a family business. It may be not wrong, but I do not consider that example as a family business. When I hear the phase family business I think of a small or medium company in which most (not necessarily all) of the staff are relatives.
    To sum up, I think that arguments in a family business could affect you at a personal level much harder than in a "regular business".
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 1,175 Teacher
    edited February 28
    You're right @oscar001 ! :D I guess if the majority are family businesses, they should be the 'regular' ones! I guess I don't know what name to call the non-family businesses! Maybe the idea is more that it's not the business which your family owns; you could technically work for a family business, but not be part of that family, and therefore not think of it that way - like in your example about the company with 200 employees owned by two sisters.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 11,165 mod
    You must have a very close relationship and good understanding with your family to run a family business.
    Resolving problems in a family business depends a lot of that.
    It's easier to accept or to say no to members of a regular business than to members of a family business.
    I think a small family, with one child for example, has more chances to survive than a big family in a family business.


    I haven't worked in a family business; my own or somebody else's.
    I have a quite big family and I don't think we can go along so well to be able run a family business successfully. :D
    At least, it would be difficult for me. ;)

  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,430 mod
    Hi @oscar001,

    Here is your correction:-

    I've never worked in a family business. However, I have close friends who work in family businesses: I think that on the one hand, minor problems can be resolved easily. On the other hand, when it comes to making important decisions, e.g. where some money is put at risk, that could end up destroying relationships.

    I see Natasha, that you call "working for a company with no family members" a regular business. I've read somewhere that two thirds of companies are family run companies. Therefore, it should be the other way round. i.e. a regular company should be a family company.

    Anyway, I'm not so certain about it, but maybe by looking into it a little more we could start to understand why they say so. I mean, maybe they consider that a 200 staff company owned by two sisters is a family business. I may be wrong, but I do not consider that example to be a family business. When I hear the phrase family business I think of a small or medium sized company in which most (not necessarily all) of the staff members are relatives.

    To sum up, I think that arguments in a family business could affect you at a personal level much harder than in a "regular business".
  • TeachTeach Your Teacher HomePosts: 10,430 mod
    @april - Here is your correction:-

    You would have to have a very close relationship and good understanding with your family to run a family business. Resolving problems in a family business depends a lot on that. It's easier to accept or to say no to members of a regular business than to members of a family business. Maybe a small family, with one child for example, has more chances of survival than one run by a big family.

    I have never worked in a family business; my own or somebody else's, but
    I have quite a big family and I don't think we get along well enough to be able to run a family business successfully.

    At least, it would be difficult for me.
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