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By all these lovely tokens
September days are here,
With summer’s best of weather
And autumn’s best of cheer.

Helen Hunt Jackson - September
The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

John Updike, September
Learn English in September

Building works

amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
edited March 1 in Home and Family
Dismantling the old kitchen.

Have you got any work happening? Have you had some done recently? What work did you last do on your home?
Post edited by amatsuscribbler on
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Comments

  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    edited March 1
    First day


  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    edited March 1
    Day 2 - the bulk of the kitchen is gone to it's new home. Nice to recycle! We didn't charge anything for it including the appliances, knowing that it was not going to landfill is enough! Just the fridge, washing machine and sink left.
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    edited March 1
    My first EVER totally microwave cooked meal. Well, that I know about! with no oven or hob we bought a microwave so we didn't starve!


  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    This looks very appetizing @amatsuscribbler. At least you have a nice big kitchen to move around in. Just keep thinking how nice it will be when it's all done.
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    Now the builders are here and the door is gone already. They seem very nice and were on time so it's looking good!
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    The open plan look!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2
    Here are some photos, but they were shot in the process and not for a presentation.
    Exterior

    IMG-0089
    IMG-2527
    Backyarrd-facade
    Entrance-door
    exterior-2

    Hall
    Hall-bedroom-doors
    Hall-ceiling
    Hall-living-room-entrance

    Open plan kitchen/living room
    Kitchen-corner-1
    Kitchen-corner
    Kitchen-cupboard
    Kitchen-Tiling-1
    Kitchen-Floor-Tiling
    Kitchen-Tiles-Close-Up
    Kitchen-Tiling-One
    Living-room-3
    Living-room-wall-puttying
    Living-room
    Living-room2

    Bathroom
    Bathroom
    Door-bathroom
    Door-view
    Sink-table
    Table-with-sink
    Tap
    Toilet-corner

    Bedroom 1
    Bedroom-wallpaper
    Flooring

    Bedroom 2

    Door-DD-bedroom
    Flooring-2
    Wallpaper-DD-bedroom
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    And Lo. The wall is gone!



    Well almost!
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    @Practical_Severard - You did a lot of work! Were you living in it while you did it?
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭

    @Practical_Severard - You did a lot of work! Were you living in it while you did it?

    This is a weekend house, we also live there for two months in summer, when the wife has holidays in her university. We weren't using it for the first seven years, until the interior was complete. We've lived there since November 2018, when there was no any furniture or kitchen appliances. Though now we've got some stuff.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard will this be your retirement home? It looks lovely. I especially like your kitchen.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 3

    Day 2 - the bulk of the kitchen is gone to it's new home. Nice to recycle! We didn't charge anything for it including the appliances, knowing that it was not going to landfill is enough! Just the fridge, washing machine and sink left.

    This fridge looks very small for a family. Is it a wine fridge? I can also see a coaxial flue continuous flow water heater in a corner . It's interesting that you have a washing machine in the kitchen, I thought the usual place for one in the English speaking world was in a laundry room, where there were a drying machine and an ironing board.

    The sink at the window hints that you had a dishwasher rather than washed dishes by hand, because there are no place for a dish drywer cabinet in vicinity.

    The sink in front of a window is rare here, mainly due to austerity Soviet design principles and because we normally have a radiator under every window. But didn't it make the window glass dirty? Wiping splashes reaching over the sink cabinet wasn't very convinient, I guess.

    This placing may be also far enough from a sewage rise and this will require an extra horisontal vent pipe for the wastewater to go well through the sink hole.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    @Practical_Severard will this be your retirement home? It looks lovely. I especially like your kitchen.

    I guess it will be, living in the country in fresh air and being not exposed to a multi-million city noise is very relaxing.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    My sister has a sink under a window. At least it is very light, so you can easily see if the dishes are clean @Practical_Severard. I think most washing machines are located in the kitchen, unless the bathroom is large enough for it to go there instead. Most homes do not have the luxury of a utility room. I had my washing machine in the bathroom in my previous flat, but this was because the kitchen was far too small.

    Dishwashers? I don't know if @amatsuscribbler is like me, but I tend not to use a dishwasher that much, finding it as quick and easy to wash up by hand. My mother has a small worktop-size dishwasher that she uses all the time however.
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    @Practical_Severard - I would love to have a fridge full of wine! lol I have never had a house big enough to have a utility so my washing machine has always been in the kitchen. We do the ironing upstairs so have to carry it up. I love having the sink in front of a window. You spend so much time there it's lovely to watch the birds on the feeder and making their nests in the Silver Birch tree.
    @mheredge We will be having a small dishwasher as I do find them very useful when we have guests!

    It's been a very noisy day today. I have a headache! lol
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    I have a wine fridge which I needed when I was in my last place. It got hot in the summer in my apartment and since I didn't have a cellar then, it was a useful alternative. Now I have the luxury of a cellar, I just store a few bottles of wine in it but have it unplugged and use it as an additional worktop in the kitchen.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 3
    mheredge said:

    My sister has a sink under a window. At least it is very light, so you can easily see if the dishes are clean @Practical_Severard.

    Daylight is undoubtely a benefit, here we use undercupboard lighting more.
    mheredge said:


    I think most washing machines are located in the kitchen, unless the bathroom is large enough for it to go there instead. Most homes do not have the luxury of a utility room. I had my washing machine in the bathroom in my previous flat, but this was because the kitchen was far too small.

    Yes, either kitchen or a bathroom are typical place for a washing machine, however I've met accounts of them in a mudroom, though that's usually about smaller flats.
    mheredge said:

    My mother has a small worktop-size dishwasher that she uses all the time however.

    This is interesting, can it accomodate larger vessels like pots or frying pans?
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 4

    I love having the sink in front of a window. You spend so much time there it's lovely to watch the birds on the feeder and making their nests in the Silver Birch tree.

    Well, it's nice indeed, but aren't you supposed to look more at the dishes rather than at in the window?


    It's been a very noisy day today. I have a headache! lol

    Courage! This will end soon enough.

    Post edited by Practical_Severard on
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    You wouldn't be able to fit many saucepans in the smaller dishwasher, but yes, one or two probably could fit. I never wash pans in mine washer, as I find they don't clean up as well as by washing them by hand @Practical_Severard.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 4
    mheredge said:

    You wouldn't be able to fit many saucepans in the smaller dishwasher, but yes, one or two probably could fit. I never wash pans in mine washer, as I find they don't clean up as well as by washing them by hand @Practical_Severard.

    Thank you. I hadn't known about desktop dishwashers until you mentioned your mother's and now I'm thinking about getting one for us. I heard before that a regular dishwasher was too big and people ran them once a week what didn't seem rational, especially for a small family of two like us now.
    This bad cleaning of pans may baffle from buying though, and the wife doesn't want anything stubbornly though she has to wear gloves when washing up.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    I converted to the idea of a small dishwasher when I was staying in Paris for six months in a flat that had little more than a cubby hole as a kitchen @Practical_Severard. When I returned home to Britain, I treated myself to one and found it useful, if only for when I had guests. Though the smaller size makes it practical as it doesn't take long to fill. My mother thought it was a brilliant idea, so she invested in one. She uses her one every day.

    I would never have bought a dishwasher if one wasn't already there, in the kitchen. The French have always seemed very keen on dishwashers as I remember even as a kid, being amazed by what was then, a relatively gadget in British kitchens. (In fact I never knew any of my friends' families with one in the 70s).

    I think pans that are not too dirty clean up fine. I have a friend who swears by her dishwasher for pans.
  • VokVok Posts: 2,150 ✭✭✭✭
    I always think that a dishwasher in the kitchen is redundant among other white goods. It's maybe because I've never had one and it's one of those appliances that you have to buy and try first to understand how either useful and useless it is. If anything, I don't have any problems with washing dishes after myself. The only appliance I'd like to see on my kitchen additionally to those I already have, but always stop short of buying, is a toaster.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm inclined to agree @Vok. I think the washing machine is the most useful white good (after a fridge). I had this discussion with the flat agency that lets out my flat in the UK when they were arguing that a dishwasher was de rigeur these days however. (I lost). I only use it (occasionally) because it is there and if it broke down, I'd be inclined to get shot of it as the space would be useful.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    mheredge said:

    I'm inclined to agree @Vok. I think the washing machine is the most useful white good (after a fridge). I had this discussion with the flat agency that lets out my flat in the UK when they were arguing that a dishwasher was de rigeur these days however. (I lost). I only use it (occasionally) because it is there and if it broke down, I'd be inclined to get shot of it as the space would be useful.

    @mheredge, @Vok, I've had a word with my wife to propose buying one for the city flat which badly needs a renovation, though we won't be able to do this in this year. She refused, so we'll probably strike it out in the purchase list. I don't think imposing a way how to run the kitchen on a man's wife a fruitful strategy for a man.
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,946 mod
    This is, I hope, the moment we turn a corner and things start to change the opposite way and improve! I can only thank the weather gods that it has been dry and cold instead of wet wet wet!


    @Practical_Severard - you could well be right on both counts lol but the birds are much more fun than washing up!

    @Vok I have never had a toaster either. But I think I might get one when we are finished just to save using the oven every time.


  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    I only got myself a toaster quite recently @Vok and @amatsuscribbler. I don't use it much but it is certainly a lot more economical than turning on the oven's grill when I just want some toasted bread.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 6

    This is, I hope, the moment we turn a corner and things start to change the opposite way and improve! I can only thank the weather gods that it has been dry and cold instead of wet wet wet!

    Are you going to do something to the roof?

    I think that putting up some plastic film on the windows and the glass door might be a good idea if some "wet" jobs (plastering, puttying, painting, etc) are on the agenda.

    It's interesting enough that your ceiling is a wooden structure, therefore combustible, but you likely have a buried wiring which seems to have been layed out without any uncombustible enclosure. Here it'd have violated the country's electric regulations (though many private households don't care) and a possible option is a gas-welded metal pipework grounded on the both ends. There are flexible metal pipes, but I'm not sure that they can effectively confine an electric arc. You might want to discuss this issue with your contractor. But the cost could be considerable.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    Do you mean ceiling @Practical_Severard? I hope @amatsuscribbler has nothing wrong with her roof.

    This is why I keep dragging my feet to repaint the places on my ceiling where the paint has come down. I don't mind the actual job of painting, but it's the precautions to make sure nothing else gets a coat of paint that I'm most worried about.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 2,825 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 6
    mheredge said:

    Do you mean ceiling @Practical_Severard? I hope @amatsuscribbler has nothing wrong with her roof.

    Both, actually, she was worrying about weather, but all the works on the photos are indoors. So I thought that something about the roof was on the plan.
    mheredge said:


    This is why I keep dragging my feet to repaint the places on my ceiling where the paint has come down. I don't mind the actual job of painting, but it's the precautions to make sure nothing else gets a coat of paint that I'm most worried about.

    Yes, sometimes you more time for covering things then for actual painting.

  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 44,877 ✭✭✭✭
    I think it is more that workmen are going in and out and so if the weather took a turn for the worst, they would be making a lot of mess @Practical_Severard.

    I'll get around to it at some point. I still need to get a paint roller and the paint!
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