Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
There I was on a July morning,
I was looking for love.
With the strength
Of a new day dawning
And the beautiful sun.
And at the sound
Of the first bird singing
I was leaving for home.
With the storm
And the night behind me
Yeah, and a road of my own.

Uriah Heep - July Morning
Learn English in June

Marianne's Monday 9 November discussion: Success and Failure

mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
edited January 18 in People and Society
What is meant by success and failure? In this 17 minute talk, the speaker examines our ideas of success and failure, and questions the assumptions underlying these two judgments. Is success always earned? Is failure? He makes an eloquent, witty case to move beyond snobbery to find true pleasure in our work.

https://www.ted.com/talks/alain_de_botton_a_kinder_gentler_philosophy_of_success/transcript?referrer=playlist-how_to_survive_following_your_passions

We can explore the idea of job snobbery: "The dominant kind of snobbery that exists nowadays is job snobbery. You encounter it within minutes at a party, when you get asked that famous iconic question of the early 21st century, "What do you do?" According to how you answer that question, people are either incredibly delighted to see you, or look at their watch and make their excuses."

Have you ever encountered this?

How does what we do reflect on the way people see us?

As there is just one talk with the transcript, I suggest that we focus on the vocabulary used here. (Watch out! I might test you on these words).

- snobs
- snobbery
- iconic question
- correlation
- paradoxical
- taboo
- accede
- kickback
- meritocracy
- exhilarating
- secularist person
- hold your horses
- solace
- bare bones
- spectrum
- transcendent
- to be nuanced about something (look at the context)
- insight
- probe
- randomness
- haphazard
- claustrophobic
- exemplary

Post edited by Teach on

Comments

Sign In or Register to comment.