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A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
There I was on a July morning,
I was looking for love.
With the strength
Of a new day dawning
And the beautiful sun.
And at the sound
Of the first bird singing
I was leaving for home.
With the storm
And the night behind me
Yeah, and a road of my own.

Uriah Heep - July Morning
Learn English in June

Marianne's Friday 29 January 2021 presentation: Being a bug

mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
edited March 11 in Animals and Pets
You need to imagine that you are a bug. You can chose to be any kind of creepy crawly you like. You should tell us about yourself, and you should recount 'a day in the life of' your chosen insect.

Only insects allowed here! You should use the first person, so you are describing yourself as the insect. You don't need to be factual and can make up a story if you like.

You might need to do some research to find out more about your chosen creature.

For example:

I'm a mayfly, more commonly known in the UK as an up-winged fly (I think mayfly sounds a lot nicer). I am cousin to the more commonly known dragonfly and also live by the water. Our ancestry can be seen to go back the first flying insects, with our long tails and wings. We can be found all over the world except for a very few places. We are eaten not just by fish, but humans too. We are estimated to contain the most raw protein content of any edible insect by dry weight. In Malawi, they make 'kungu', a paste where we are mixed with mosquitoes to make into a cake for eating. We are also seen as a delicacy in many parts of China and Japan.

We have to be very careful of fishermen, as they like to use us as bait. In France, they used to press us into cakes to use as bird food and fishbait. We also get used to provide fisheries with an excellent diet for fish.

We even have been made famous by N i k e, when they produced a line of running shoes in 2003 called "Mayfly". These shoes were designed with a wing pattern like ours and were also said to have a finite lifetime. (I would have thought that this would be a very poor selling point, as we don't live very long). More appropriately Vodafone featured us in a branding campaign and told consumers to "make the most of now"!

When we're young, we are called nymphs (the lads are naiads) and we spend a few years in the water, gradually emerging to suddenly transform into adulthood. I am now an adult female and very delicate-looking, with two pairs of triangular wings that are extensively covered with fine veins. I have short, flexible antennae, large eyes, and a long, slender body.

If the fisherman doesn't get me first, I won't live long in any case. I am any way a favourite food for fish, so have to be very careful not to stay near the water. In particular, Rainbow trout are love us. I like especially to hover over the water around dawn or dusk, when the sun is not so fierce. And now I am an adult, I do not have time to feed as I am only interested in finding a mate as quickly as possible. I probably won't see tomorrow, as we normally have an incredibly short lifespan.

The guys usually congregate in swarms a few metres above the water to perform their suggestive courtship dances. Each insect has their own characteristic up-and-down pattern of movement and strong wingbeats propelling them upwards and forwards with their tail sloping down. We girls will then fly into these swarms, find our mate, and mate in the air.

I see a big cloud of male mayflies ahead. Here goes! Flying into the swarm, I see a very handsome male rising up to me. He grabs me around my thorax from below using with his front legs bent upwards. It is all over within just a few seconds, but he stays with me and we fly in tandem, eventually fluttering to the ground. After a while he bids me farewell and flies off to return the following day and repeat his dance.

As soon as I have laid my eggs, my job is done. I can relax. And I can now just fly off until I get tired and fall into the water.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayfly




Post edited by Teach on

Comments

  • filauziofilauzio Genoa ( Italy )Posts: 2,117 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yes, you can say so. Every year we go wintering in North Africa but it isn't just to spend our leisure time on holiday. In our case is just a matter of survival since we couldn't bear the low temperature of the Northern latitudes.

    Nevertheless it is the same with the arid climate which is going to set in here in a few weeks. To make it short let's say we need a temperate climate all year long.

    I'm a butterfly known as Painted Lady, I live all over the world where the conditions are suitable but I'm proud to say I'm resistant enough to thrive virtually all over the world.

    In fact I don't need much resources to live upon. I can make do just with a little bit of pollen I can find over stretches of grass gleaming with full bloom.

    Oh I'm delighted by the intense inebriating perfume emanating from the newly opened corollas. I enjoy standing on the petals while sucking the nectar up by means of my ' trumpet '.

    No sooner I've satiated though than we have to leave. Just the time to sunbathe a bit to dry our wings. I like sunbathing resting on a stone while fluttering slowly my wings.

    That's when I have to be more careful of any looming shadows at my back though. Humans like to take a close-up sight in such occasions and many can't resist trying to catch us either.

    The advantage of our migration is that we don't need to pack up. Just having a substantial meal is enough to support us along the journey. What a journey though ! I'd rather call it an Odyssey. We will travel from North Africa to central Europe flying thousands of miles.

    You know we are veteran travellers and can fly up to 160 kilometers long legs at a time. We usually fly in swarms close to the ground and invariably as the crow flies. When we come across a tall building then we all approach and cross straight over it as though we were a mighty rising wave.

    Humans say the effect is so fascinating and, what a strange word, instagrammable as well to the point they can't resist taking pictures of it.

    Sometimes we pass along straight roads where cars proceed in slow lanes. That's funny because we can fly abreast of the cars' windows and we can see children waving openmouthed at us passing by. We can reach a speed of 40 kilometers per hour.

    We mate in air and sometimes a group of us land on suitable ground to allow the females to lay eggs.

    After 3-5 days a caterpillar develops. After about a month it envelops in a form called chrysalis. Here, within a bit more than one week there happens a miracolous transformation. A metamorphosis that lead to the marvellous flying insect with colourful patterned wings.

    Henceforward the life cycle starts again and within about a month the young butterfly has to know its surrounding making the most of its short life. Here its eyes still rheumy, its body still stiff for having only just wriggled off its sarcophagus, the insect will have to start off careful of the springy green lizard waiting in ambush.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanessa_cardui
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2020
    filauzio said:

    Yes, you can say so. Every year we go wintering in North Africa, but it isn't just to spend our leisure time on holiday. In our case it is just a matter of survival since we can't bear the low temperature of the Northern latitudes.

    Nevertheless it is the same with the arid climate which is going to set in here in a few weeks. To make it short, let's say we need a temperate climate all year long.

    I'm a butterfly known as Painted Lady. I live all over the world where the conditions are suitable but I'm proud to say I'm resistant enough to thrive virtually all over the world.

    In fact I don't need much resources to live upon. I can make do just with a little bit of pollen that I can find over stretches of grass gleaming in full bloom.

    Oh I'm delighted by the intense inebriating perfume emanating from the newly opened corollas. I enjoy standing on the petals while sucking the nectar up by means of my ' trumpet '.

    No sooner I've satiated though, than we have to leave. Just the time to sunbathe a bit to dry our wings. I like sunbathing resting on a stone while fluttering slowly my wings.

    That's when I have to be more careful of any looming shadows on my back though. Humans like to take a close-up sighting on such occasions and many can't resist trying to catch us either.

    The advantage of our migration is that we don't need to pack up. Just having a substantial meal is enough to support us along the journey. What a journey though ! I'd rather call it an Odyssey. We will travel from North Africa to central Europe flying thousands of miles.

    You know we are veteran travellers and can fly up to 160 kilometers long legs at a time. We usually fly in swarms close to the ground and invariably as the crow flies. When we come across a tall building, then we all approach and cross straight over it as though we were a mighty rising wave.

    Humans say the effect is so fascinating and, what a strange word, instagrammable as well, to the point they can't resist taking pictures of it.

    Sometimes we pass along straight roads where cars proceed in slow lines. That's funny because we can fly abreast of the cars' windows and we can see children waving open-mouthed at us passing by. We can reach a speed of 40 kilometers per hour.

    We mate in the air and sometimes a group of us land on suitable ground to allow the females to lay eggs.

    After 3-5 days, a caterpillar develops. After about a month it envelops in a form called chrysalis. Here, within a bit more than one week there happens a miraculous transformation. A metamorphosis that lead to the marvellous flying insect with colourful patterned wings.

    Henceforward the life cycle starts again and within about a month the young butterfly has to know its surroundings, making the most of its short life. Here its eyes still rheumy, its body still stiff from having only just wriggled off its sarcophagus, the insect will have to start off, careful of the springy green lizard waiting in ambush.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanessa_cardui

    This is really good @filauzio. The use of commas is something you might want to look at (I am not sure my additional commas show very well, even in bold):

    https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/punctuation/commas/extended_rules_for_commas.html

    I think the Painted Lady was the only butterfly I knew until I went to Nepal, where I was astonished to come across it there too. Apparently the UK has 59 species of butterfly, including two migrants, one of which is the Painted Lady (I didn't know this before just now). By contract Nepal boasts 651 species of butterflies (3.72 percent of the world's butterflies) according to official records. Including of course, the Painted Lady.


  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
    @Hermine I think life as an insect is especially tough these days. If you don't want to tell a story, you can describe yourself like @filauzio has done here.
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 35,510 mod
    edited January 29



    A day in the life of a horned mason bee.

    It is a beautiful sunny spring day in the garden where I live. There are some fruit trees and a lot of flowers. The trees are already in bloom and the flowerbeds are becoming very colourful.

    I hear a lot of buzzing; it looks like the other friends have woken up too.

    Maybe as you know I am a pretty bee with my dark black hairy head with feeler horns (for finding pollen and nectar) and a soft reddish-orange abdomen. My brothers do not have horns; they have long antennae for detecting females.

    I live in dry hollows of split branches and woodwork, also in holes from tree trunks and wooden fences.

    Today it is time to come out, to fly out and to mate. The males are already flying wild back and forth and showing their graceful mating dances. They fly in swarms around the nesting places of all females.

    As soon as I fly outside, I am chased by a whole swarm of buzzing males. I enjoy it.

    After this delightful time, I go in search of a suitable hollow to make my nest cells.
    I find a nice wind-free old trunk and in a cavity, I start to cover the inside with clay. Bees have the possibility to produce a fatty substance, called wax. They use wax to build structures in the cavity that hold eggs and stores nectar.

    When this task has finished, I fly from flower to flower and collect nectar and pollen to bring to my nest cells. But while flying back and forth, pollen also falls and therefore I pollinate new plants and maintain biodiversity in my garden.

    My nesting cells are now complete ready to lay my eggs to start developing of my offspring.

    The bee eggs become larvae (like little white worms) and then a few weeks later they emerge into beautiful new bees. The growth is fast because of the richness of proteins and sugars from the nectar and pollen.

    As an adult bee, I live only a few weeks, but the life cycle is continued by the new generations until the end of autumn.

    The last larvae remain in the wooden hollows alive until the next spring when they will emerge as bees.

    Our bee community is very harmonious, each one has its own task. The females are the workers and maintain the pollination and with their egg production they create new generations.

    The males' tasks are to charm the lady’s whit their mating dance and then to fertilize them but be assured that everything goes harmoniously without any quarrelling.

    Don’t forget, if you hear bees among flowers be glad because in this environment is nature rich, and crops and plants will grow there. Then you live on a place where agriculture is still alive.




    Post edited by Paulette on
  • MichouxeMichouxe Posts: 12,354 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 4
    @Paulette, A very nice story!
    Post edited by Michouxe on
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 30,165 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 29
    I woke up from a dream and found that my body has been morphed into a black shiny beetle called Bog Beetle. I love to live in darkness as the light brings more chaos in my life. I find darkness more meditative and healing in many ways that make me reveal my core characteristics especially my distinctive voice.

    I love to creep through the nooks and corners of the caves, of the cracked hills and mountains, of the houses, and old bushes where I camouflage myself and let man to be more curious about me only by hearing my voice.

    I love to sing in the monsoon, cry in autumn, and allure my partner in spring. All seasons give me a new voice that I manifest as some rhythmic songs. I love to sing loud when I feel I really need some attention from the world, I sing in low tone when there is a crowd around me, though that crowd is not interested in my voice or singing but find it more creepy and disrupting. But, I sing and share my voice giving a damn to the world and their opinions about me.

    I am also known as the night queen in countries where I help wanderers to find their path by hearing my voice, I also inspire poets, writers, and intellectuals to listen to my voice and let their imagination run wild, and write songs, stories, poems where they use me as a metaphor. A metaphor for life, death, despair, grief, departure, arrival, and mystery. I become their voice in a way and people sing their praises when they hear the stories about me. I feel proud and happy that I am considered as one of the literary bugs who never miss the limelight of literature and creative writing.

    I find myself a symbol of melancholy when it comes to deep winter nights, and sing the song for those who lost their path or want to cheer up during self-isolation. I find myself a symbol of love when it comes spring where I chirp like many other birds and bugs, I also allure my partner for matting, and reproduce another generation who carries on my voice, whispers, songs, and secrets. I find myself a symbol of hope when autumn leaves swirl around trees in the park and gardens, and become their voice by hiding underneath them, and sing loudly to pierce the autumn hush. I find myself a symbol of light when the night is shrouded in darkness and silence, and leave shadows behind that haunt the poor souls. I find myself the symbol of calmness when people enjoy listening to my songs during their meditation, and find it soothing to unwind their chaotic daily routine.

    I don't want to sound like a narcissist by sharing some of my characteristics but I am highlighting how a small bug can bring some massive changes in someone's life that they hardly notice.

    I keep on singing, whispering, chirping, and crying from generations to generations in every nook and corner of this world so that people get inspired by voice if not my anonymity.

    My voice is what makes me unique in many ways. Hope yours as well. :)
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 35,510 mod
    That's really amazing @Bubbly my story is a piece of cake compared to yours.
  • MichouxeMichouxe Posts: 12,354 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 29

    As a child I always wanted to be a fly so that I could see everything that is happening in the houses.
    Too bad but I learned that not everyone loves me, maybe because It is because I'm just a simple housefly?

    But I am a really play bird (fly) I'm not that big about 6 to 8 millimeters and I like good food! Huge large creatures called humans live here too. They have very large feeding places, called plates. But they won't let me eat even a bit! You can't believe how stingy they are ! They must know it's my home too?

    I'm almost sure that they are jealous because I have two transparent wings and I can fly as the best , I'm really a stunt pilot. It’s child's play for me. But when I got closer to this humans , everyone was in turmoil, they beat wild around them and my first idea was that they wanted to learn to fly too or maybe play tag! But they wave and beat with their hands , even with newspapers and other strange objects where I don't know the name from . I'm getting tired of it. Even If I want to rest on the wall they want to hit me.

    Don't those humans , see in my beautiful vermilion red brown eyes that I want to enjoy of the homely atmosphere here? Good thing that I have a good view with all that homely violence ,have you seen already a fly with glasses? My eyes called "facet eyes " therefore consist of 4000 small individual hexagonal light detectors.

    Can you believe these weird people said that I make people sick. While I don't nothing else than wash myself from head to paws all days. Then I have those other housemates, the house spiders with their artistic sticky webs, so called useful creatures and that because they want to eat me ! How is it possible to eat a roommate .... cannibals they are!

    And all that happens in my short life, barely 2 to 3 months and then I have to take care of the offspring, that's a lot of work , you know ! I have to lay no less than 500 to 1000 eggs. You can assume that it is not a life anymore !

    Fortunately I sometimes come outside , I like the nature and I take care for pollinate the flowers and for exterminate caterpillars and fleas. But luckily….? danger lurks everywhere! I already have to be careful around the fishing pond again, Yes those fish love me very much too, but only to eat me!

    Ho dear! Suddenly, I see a big flying object , it seems like a jet fighter .... oh no...it’s a bird ,sigh…. I have to hide somewhere as soon as possible !

    So now you see that a fly doesn't have an easy life!
  • MichouxeMichouxe Posts: 12,354 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A great story @Bubbly , I still have a lot to learn! I almost dared to post my story🙄.

    @Paulette @Bubbly, both stories are awesome!
  • HermineHermine Posts: 9,636 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 1


    Ladybird
    I think this kind of beetle mustn’t be missing here.

    At the end of April and the begin of Mai it is the time of mating and the eggs will be laid on a secure place underneath of leaves. We remain there for 5 to 8 days and after hatching from the eggs we become larvas which takes as further 30 to 60 days to become wonderful ladybirds in different colours and in different shapes.
    Our hemishperic airworthy body has a shard with dots. We live all over the world. Some people breed us, because we are very helpful in the agriculture.
    People like as very, because our prefered food are plant lies and spider mites als well as mildew. We are to be seen on postcards and are moyos. We look so cute.

    We are also cannibals. If we are too many, the freshly hatched larves will eat the not yet hatched fellow species.

    In winter we look for places in corners of windows where we sleep tightly together until the circuit of life starts anew.

    @mheredge, I hope the text is not too short.
    ———————————-
    Hi, I’m Rosi the hen. I live in Tyrol in a hen house with three other hens. We arrived all together in the same delivery box, that means we are very friendly to each other.

    Let me tell you how my day looks like. At the very moment when the day wakes up we come to live as well, we still sit on our perch for some time to look out of the window. Some of us try to preen, but we do this often during the day.

    After a while the lighter ones of us jump down onto the floor whereas the bulky ones use the ladder.
    We have a yellow bowl hanging from the ceiling fixed on a chain filled with seeds, corn and a certain flour special made for my species.
    Next to it is a water bowl sitting on a heated mat. The reason why we have it in is the water we drink shouldn’t freeze.

    I eat and drink and by looking around at the corner there is a huge basket filled with sand and ash. Burgel is most of the time in there – she likes to spread the content overal her body. Although she knows that we also would like to get a bath she doesn’t move. The only option for us is to squash in. It is not seldom that we are in a threesome.

    The blue plastic box filled with hay is sitting at another corner. In the morning we use it interchangeably and it also could happen we are in in twos. A time ago we had a second box but no-one of was interested in sitting in it, so it was taken away that gives as also more space.

    Around noon when I hear foot steps coming closer, that means our food gets delievered. The door goes open as well as the second one which is wooden framed and the rest is grid. We can look outside and get fresh air but we can’t escape. As soon as the second door is open Burgl is always the first one who jumps outside, without knowing what could happen out there to her. At the moment outside lays snow but she doesn’t care. Stupid girl.

    Around the perch where we put our poo will be cleaned daily and we get fresh water and the box with corn will be refilled once a week.
    Now comes the most important part of the day, we get our food. Burgl doesn’t care so Hermine has to put her inside and she can enjoy with us.

    We spend the rest of the day inside – but only because it is snowy outside. As soon as the nature starts to work again we are allowed to go out into our pen where we can scratch and hide and pick as much as we want, sigh, sigh, but until then some time will have to pass.

    The days are short so we have to withdraw ourself onto the perch before night falls. We are complet blind in the darkness so it is better to search for a nice place to sit on beforehand.

    Nighty night.

    Post edited by Hermine on
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
    Paulette said:




    A day in the life of a horned mason bee.

    It is a beautiful sunny spring day in the garden where I live. There are some fruit trees and a lot of flowers. The trees are already in bloom and the flowerbeds are becoming very colourful.

    I hear a lot of buzzing; it looks like the other friends have woken up too.

    Maybe as you know I am a pretty bee with my dark black hairy head with feeler horns (for finding pollen and nectar) and a soft reddish-orange abdomen. My brothers do not have horns; they have long antennae for detecting females.

    I live in dry hollows of split branches and woodwork, also in holes in tree trunks and wooden fences.

    Today it is time to come out, to fly out and to mate. The males are already flying wildly back and forth and showing their graceful mating dances. They fly in swarms around the nesting places of all the females.

    As soon as I fly outside, I am chased by a whole swarm of buzzing males. I enjoy it.

    After this delightful time, I go in search of a suitable hollow to make my nest cells.
    I find a nice wind-free old trunk and in a cavity, I start to cover the inside with clay. Bees have the possibility to produce a fatty substance, called wax. They use wax to build structures in the cavity that hold eggs and stores nectar.

    When this task has finished, I fly from flower to flower and collect nectar and pollen to bring to my nest cells. But while flying back and forth, pollen also falls and therefore I pollinate new plants and maintain biodiversity in my garden.

    My nesting cells are now complete ready to lay my eggs to start raising of my offspring.

    The bee eggs become larvae (like little white worms) and then a few weeks later they emerge into beautiful new bees. The growth is fast because of the richness of proteins and sugars from the nectar and pollen.

    As an adult bee, I live only a few weeks, but the life cycle is continued by the new generations until the end of autumn.

    The last larvae remain in the wooden hollows alive until the next spring when they will emerge as bees.

    Our bee community is very harmonious, each one has its own task. The females are the workers and maintain the pollination and with their egg production they create new generations.

    The males' tasks are to charm the lady’s with their mating dance and then to fertilize them but be assured that everything goes harmoniously without any quarrelling.

    Don’t forget, if you hear bees among flowers be glad because in this environment is nature rich, and crops and plants will grow there. Then you live in a place where agriculture is still alive.

    Very good @Paulette.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
    Hermine said:



    Ladybird
    I think this kind of beetle mustn’t be missed here.

    At the end of April and the beginning of May it is the time of mating and the eggs will be laid on a secure place underneath of leaves. We remain there for 5 to 8 days and after hatching from the eggs we become larvae which takes as further 30 to 60 days to become wonderful ladybirds in different colours and in different shapes.
    Our hemispheric airworthy body has a shard with dots. We live all over the world. Some people breed us, because we are very helpful in the agriculture.
    People like us very much, because our preferred food are plant lies and spider mites als well as mildew. We are to be seen on postcards and are mojos. We look so cute.

    We are also cannibals. If we are too many, the freshly hatched larvae will eat the not yet hatched fellow species.

    In winter we look for places in corners of windows where we sleep tightly together until the circuit of life starts anew.

    @mheredge, I hope the text is not too short.
    ———————————-
    Hi, I’m Rosi the hen. I live in Tyrol in a hen house with three other hens. We arrived all together in the same delivery box, and this means we are very friendly to each other.

    Let me tell you how my day looks like. At the very moment when the day wakes up we come to life as well. We still sit on our perch for some time to look out of the window. Some of us try to preen, but we do this often during the day.

    After a while the lighter ones of us jump down onto the floor whereas the bulky ones use the ladder.
    We have a yellow bowl hanging from the ceiling fixed on a chain filled with seeds, corn and a certain flour specially made for my species.
    Next to it is a water bowl sitting on a heated mat. The reason why we have it in is so the water we drink shouldn’t freeze.

    I eat and drink and by looking around at the corner there is a huge basket filled with sand and ash. Burgel is most of the time in there – she likes to spread the content over all her body. Although she knows that we also would like to get a bath she doesn’t move. The only option for us is to squash in. It is not seldom that we are in a threesome.

    The blue plastic box filled with hay is sitting at another corner. In the morning we use it interchangeably and it also could happen we are in it in twos. A time ago we had a second box but no-one of was interested in sitting in it, so it was taken away to gives us also more space.

    Around noon when I hear foot steps coming closer, that means our food gets delivered. The outer door goes opens as well as the second one which is wooden framed and made from a grid. We can look outside and get fresh air but we can’t escape. As soon as the second door is open Burgl is always the first one who jumps outside, without knowing what could happen out there to her. At the moment, outside snow lays but she doesn’t care. Stupid girl.

    Around the perch where we put our poo, this will be cleaned daily and we get fresh water and the box with corn that will be refilled once a week.
    Now comes the most important part of the day, when we get our food. Burgl doesn’t care so Hermine has to put her inside and she can enjoy it with us.

    We spend the rest of the day inside – but only because it is snowy outside. As soon as the nature starts to work again we are allowed to go out into our pen where we can scratch and hide and pick as much as we want, sigh, sigh, but until then some time will have to pass.

    The days are short so we have to withdraw ourselves onto the perch before night falls. We are completely blind in the darkness so it is better to search for a nice place to sit on beforehand.

    Nighty night.

    Very well done on your two accounts @Hermine!
  • HermineHermine Posts: 9,636 ✭✭✭✭
    @Thank you Marianne.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
    Michouxe said:


    As a child I always wanted to be a fly so that I could see everything that is happening in the houses.
    Too bad but I learned that not everyone loves me, maybe because it is because I'm just a simple housefly?

    But I am a really play bird (fly). I'm not that big, about 6 to 8 millimeters and I like good food! Huge large creatures called humans live here too. They have very large feeding places, called plates. But they won't let me eat even a bit! You can't believe how stingy they are ! They must know it's my home too?

    I'm almost sure that they are jealous because I have two transparent wings and I can fly as the best. I'm really a stunt pilot. It’s child's play for me. But when I get closer to these humans , everyone goes in turmoil. They beat wildly around them and my first idea was that they wanted to learn to fly too or maybe play tag! But they waved and beat with their hands, even with newspapers and other strange objects which I don't know the name of. I'm getting tired of it. Even if I want to rest on the wall they want to hit me.

    Don't those humans , see in my beautiful vermilion red brown eyes that I want to enjoy some of the homely atmosphere here? Good thing that I have a good view with all that homely violence. Have you seen already a fly with glasses? My eyes are called "facet eyes " tand consist of 4000 small individual hexagonal light detectors.

    Can you believe these weird people said that I make people sick. While I don't nothing else than wash myself from head to paws all days. Then I have those other housemates, the house spiders with their artistic sticky webs, so called useful creatures and that is because they want to eat me ! How is it possible to eat a roommate .... cannibals they are!

    And all that happens in my short life, barely 2 to 3 months and then I have to take care of the offspring, that's a lot of work , you know ! I have to lay no less than 500 to 1000 eggs. You can assume that it is not a life any more !

    Fortunately I sometimes come outside. I like the nature and I take care to pollinate the flowers and for exterminate caterpillars and fleas. But unluckily….? danger lurks everywhere! I already have to be careful around the fishing pond again. Yes those fish love me very much too, but only to eat me!

    Ho dear! Suddenly, I see a big flying object , it seems like a jet fighter .... oh no...it’s a bird. Sigh…. I have to hide somewhere as soon as possible !

    So now you see that a fly doesn't have an easy life!

    This is excellent @Michouxe. And what a tough life it is as a fly. Maybe I will think again before I try to swat any flies that dare come close.
  • MichouxeMichouxe Posts: 12,354 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thank you very much @mheredge
    Sorry for asking you to improve my topic. I know you have a lot of work to do and it was not the end of the world that you looked over it , I think the fly would not fly away 😂.
    I don't know if this topic was okay, but that's not my biggest concern.
    I wish I could remember better, maybe It would be easier to talk?🤔
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 48,481 ✭✭✭✭
    Being a fly on the wall @Michouxe, who knows what secrets you might hear. I have a problem with little flies that I think are attracted by the water kefir I make.

    This is a drink that uses sugar, which flies love. They are amazingly resilient to insect repellent. They don't fly very fast, so if I am quick, I sometimes can catch them in my hand.

    I think your story here was excellent. You have a very good imagination.
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