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One moment alone in the garden,
Under the August skies;
The moon had gone, but the stars shone on, -
Shone like your beautiful eyes.
Away from the glitter and gaslight,
Alone in the garden there,
While the mirth of the throng, in laugh and song,
Floated out on the air.

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
In lands I never saw -- they say
Immortal Alps look down --
Whose bonnets touch the firmament --
Whose sandals touch the town --

Meek at whose everlasting feet
A myriad daisy play --
Which, Sir, are you and which am I
Upon an August day?

Emily Dickinson
August
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Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,951 mod
    mheredge said:

    Tom Hanks was in this wasn't he @GemmaRowlands? I think he makes a much better hero to the Da Vinci Code movie than the one in the book!

    Yes he was, I think he is a fantastic actor. I have seen a lot of films that he has been in, and I have enjoyed all of them.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    I just finished the book I had put down before I went away. The ending was a bit unexpected but far too sudden, as if the author wanted to finish the novel in a hurry. It was a bit of a disappointment really.
  • VokVok Posts: 1,375 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge just the fact that Tom Hanks appears in the film it is worth watching. I haven't seen this moovie but I've read the book and enjoyed it.
  • nidhiinidhii Posts: 850 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 21
    What is more interesting reading a book watching a movie based on that book?
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,951 mod
    nidhii said:

    What is more interesting reading a book watching a movie based on that book?

    It depends. I think most of the time the books are better, but there are some instances where the movie is better than the book.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    @nidhii I tend to think reading the book is better as it is your imagination that paints the images, rather than one person's interpretation (the film director or actor).
  • amatsuscribbleramatsuscribbler Posts: 3,066 mod
    edited February 22
    I'm halfway through 'Winter in Madrid' by C.J. Sansom. Teach lent me a copy then I found I already had it!
    I'm enjoying it but I feel it has been written with a view to a film contract!
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,951 mod
    Last night, I discovered that the book I was reading was the first of 10, and that made me feel very happy as I loved the first book, so I need to find the rest of them!
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    What are you reading @GemmaRowlands?

    I am alway a bit worried about series of books as I am never sure I can manage to read them in order.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,951 mod
    mheredge said:

    What are you reading @GemmaRowlands?

    I am alway a bit worried about series of books as I am never sure I can manage to read them in order.

    It's a detective series by Angela Marsons, but I have found a website where I can see the order of the books, to make sure they are all in the right order.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    I will have to take a look @GemmaRowlands, not that I'm short of books on my Kindle. It's find the time at the moment that is the biggest problem.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,951 mod
    mheredge said:

    I will have to take a look @GemmaRowlands, not that I'm short of books on my Kindle. It's find the time at the moment that is the biggest problem.

    I only ever download free books on my Kindle, as there are so many great ones, so I don't think I would recommend buying this series, as there are probably lots that are just as good.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,971 mod
    In Lent I'm going to skip wathing TV so I purchased some books, some in English and some in German.

    The one I've started reading is called ' Still Alice'. It's about a very smart woman, age fifty, who gets Alzheimer. Her brain was excellent until she notices before Christmas that there run anything wrongly about her short-term memory. She works as a Professor at Harvard and lives nearby. Once day she put on her running shoes and went off, but she couldn't find her way back home, even in the streets where she lived...... .
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,971 mod
    The other book I'm about to read is written by Andre Heller. He's famous he is one of Austrian's figureheads. He has so many things in mind and is able to implement them.

    Recently, one book is made into a film and the book is sold out.
    It's called: Wie ich lernte bei mir selbst Kind zu sein. Let me translate it: How I've learnt to be a child myself.


  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    Arthur Ransome's Swallows and Amazon books are old favourites of mine, but I didn't know that the children were in fact inspired by Syrian children. The children lived in Aleppo, Syria and their father, half-Armenian, half-Irish Ernest Altounyan, was a school friend of Ransome at Rugby. Ransome had even unsuccessfully proposed to their mother, Dora Collingwood before Altounyan married her in 1915. Their friendship with Ransome was renewed when the Altounyan family took a summer trip to the Lake District in 1928. The two men bought two boats, named Swallow and Mavis for the children and the group spent months sailing, fishing and walking together.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/mar/09/swallows-and-armenians-arthur-ransomes-forgotten-inspirations-revealed?utm_term=RWRpdG9yaWFsX0d1YXJkaWFuVG9kYXlVS19XZWVrZW5kLTE5MDMwOQ==&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GuardianTodayUK&CMP=GTUK_email



    Mavis, Taqui and Susie Altounyan, three of the five children who inspired Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons, boating with a nanny in the early 1920s. Photograph: Guzelian
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,951 mod
    Hermine said:

    In Lent I'm going to skip wathing TV so I purchased some books, some in English and some in German.

    The one I've started reading is called ' Still Alice'. It's about a very smart woman, age fifty, who gets Alzheimer. Her brain was excellent until she notices before Christmas that there run anything wrongly about her short-term memory. She works as a Professor at Harvard and lives nearby. Once day she put on her running shoes and went off, but she couldn't find her way back home, even in the streets where she lived...... .

    Wow, it is a long time to go without watching television. I don't think I could go for that long without watching it, but I wish you the best of luck. And the book that you are reading sounds very interesting indeed.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    I have done without TV for years @Hermine. There aren't enough hours in the day to stay glued to the box!
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,971 mod
    I was a type of sleeping in front of the box. I hated myself for that.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    I used to always fall asleep in front of the box when I was commuting @Hermine. I think this is what got me out of the habit of watching. (I really must try to plug in my TV and see if it works!)
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,971 mod
    haha, falling asleep is nice but to awake is horrible there. Our sofa is a hard one and small.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 9,951 mod
    Hermine said:

    haha, falling asleep is nice but to awake is horrible there. Our sofa is a hard one and small.

    I have done that a few times, and then you ache a lot when you wake up if you stay there all night.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    There's nothing worse than waking up with a crick in the neck @Hermine. Now I have a much larger, more comfortable settee, but no TV to worry about falling asleep over either.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 16
    @taghried have you read any of Charles Dickens' other books? He has written several other very good stories. If you liked David Copperfield, I'm sure you would like the others. A Christmas Carol is another excellent one.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,971 mod
    I love A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.

    In our reading session we're reading The life and adventure of Nicklas Nickleby. I have to the say the author didn't spare with words especially with adverbs.
  • taghriedtaghried Posts: 140 ✭✭✭
    I haven't read any of Charles Dickens' before this my first. I have downloaded(A Christmas Carol) and I'm going to read It. It seems interesting from the cover.
    thanks for your suggestion @mheredge .
  • VokVok Posts: 1,375 ✭✭✭
    @taghried my personal advice would be to save 'A Christmas Carol' for Christmas Eve. It'd get you into the holiday spirit.

    I'm reading 'The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment' by Eckhart Tolle. I hope that book will help me to be more focused and I'll get rid of the bad habit of having my mind all over the place.
  • mheredgemheredge Posts: 39,659 ✭✭✭✭
    @taghried Oliver Twist and Nicolas Nickleby are another two you'd like if you liked David Copperfield. I agree with @Vok, maybe A Christmas Carol is best left for Christmas!
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 7,971 mod
    I'm reading a novel about a woman who suffers Altzheimer's.
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